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AVI SPIVAK
ARTIST

Avi Spivak is a Brooklyn based artist. You might find him working at Rebel Rouser, the record store that he co-owns with drummer Josh Styles from Daddy Long Legs and William Martin . Or you might find him djing his 45s at Clem’s bar in Williamsburg.

STOOP-ENDOUS
STYLE

  • Wilhelmina model Demi Jonk photographed by Alexander Thompson, with styling by Xina Giatas for Ponyboy magazine NY.
  • Wilhelmina model Demi Jonk styled by Xina Giatas for Ponyboy magazine womenswear editorial, Stoop-endous Style. New York.
  • Wilhelmina model Demi Jonk styled by Xina Giatas for Ponyboy magazine NY.
  • Model Demi Jonk photographed by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy NY magazine vintage womenswear editorial.
  • Model Demi Jonk styled by Xina Giatas for Ponyboy magazine womenswear editorial, Stoop-endous Style. New York.
  • Model Demi Jonk photographed by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy magazine womenswear editorial, Stoop-endous Style. New York.
  • Wilhelmina model Demi Jonk photographed by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy magazine NY womenswear editorial.
  • Wilhelmina model Demi Jonk photographed by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy magazine vintage womenswear editorial. New York.
  • Wilhelmina model Demi Jonk photographed by Alexander Thompson. Ponyboy magazine New York.
  • Model Demi Jonk photographed by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy magazine womenswear editorial. New York.

STOOP-ENDOUS STYLE

MODEL DEMI JONK

Dutch model Demi Jonk from the Wilhelmina Agency New York stars in our latest Ponyboy womenswear editorial, “Stoop-endous Style”. We’ve always been enamored with the quaint and colorful old homes we’ve seen throughout the streets of Brooklyn. Our stylist/fashion editor, Xina Giatas, took this colorful inspiration and mixed designer pieces with vintage staples from some of our favorite New York City haunts, including Gilt Ridden Vintage and Worship Vintage. Photography by Alexander Thompson. Makeup by Rachel Estabrook. Hair by Erica Zimmerman for Pinmeup Hair.

LEW PHILLIPS
THE PREPPY VOICE

  • Musician Lew Phillips. Ponyboy magazine New York.
  • The young rockabilly musician know as Mr. Lew Phillips from Canada. Ponyboy magazine NY.
  • Canadian musician Lew Phillips. Ponyboy magazine New York.
  • A B&W portrait of rockabilly performer Lew Phillips. Ponyboy magazine NY.
  • Photos of Canadian musician Lew Phillips smoking. Ponyboy magazine NY.
  • Assorted photos of rockabilly musician Lew Phillips. Ponyboy magazine NY.
  • Canadian musician Lew Phillips wears formal attire onstage. Ponyboy magazine NY.
  • B&W images of Canadian musician Lew Phillips. Ponyboy magazine NY.
  • Photos of young rockabilly performer Lew Phillips. Ponyboy magazine NY.
  • Rockabilly musician Mr. Lew Phillips from Montreal Canada. Ponyboy magazine NY.
  • Tearsheets of Canadian musician Lew Phillips. Ponyboy magazine NY.
  • B&W images of Montreal musician Lew Phillips. Ponyboy magazine NY.
  • Photos of Canadian musician known as Lew Phillips. Ponyboy magazine NY.
  • 50s inspired images of musician Lew Phillips. Ponyboy magazine NY.
  • Rockabilly musician know as Mr. Lew Phillips from Montreal Canada. Ponyboy magazine NY.
  • The Preppy Voice - Canadian musician Lew Phillips. Ponyboy magazine NY.
  • Portraits of rockabilly musician Lew Phillips with guitar. Ponyboy magazine NY.
  • A turtlenecked Lew Phillips with cigarette. Ponyboy magazine NY.
  • Wild Records and Rhythm Bomb Records product for musician Lew Phillips. Ponyboy magazine NY.
  • Photos of young rockabilly Canadian musician Lew Phillips. Ponyboy magazine NY.
  • A B&W photos of rockabilly performer Lew Phillips. Ponyboy magazine NY.
  • The Preppy Voice - musician Lew Phillips. Ponyboy magazine NY.
  • B&W portrait of rockabilly performer Lew Phillips. Ponyboy magazine New York.
  • A B&W portraits of rockabilly performer Lew Phillips. Ponyboy magazine New York.
  • Portraits of Lew Phillips. Ponyboy magazine NY.
  • A B&W photos of young rockabilly performer Lew Phillips. Ponyboy magazine NY.
  • Young rockabilly Canadian musician Mr. Lew Phillips. Ponyboy magazine NY.
  • Tearsheets of musician Lew Phillips. Ponyboy magazine New York.
  • The young rockabilly musician know as Mr. Lew Phillips from Montreal Canada. Ponyboy magazine NY.
  • Canadian musician Lew Phillips. Ponyboy magazine NY.
  • Portraits of rockabilly musician Mr. Lew Phillips from Montreal Canada. Ponyboy magazine NY.
  • Portraits of the rockabilly musician Mr. Lew Phillips from Montreal. Ponyboy magazine NY.
  • B&W photos of musician Lew Phillips. Ponyboy magazine NY.

LEW PHILLIPS

THE PREPPY VOICE

Lew Phillips is the young, 23 year old Canadian musician that we stumbled upon a few years back, and since then we’ve been captivated by both his music and personal style. There are the many photographs of the handsome young singer in 50s clothing with his trademark cigarette dangling out of his mouth. At 17 he put out his first release, and shortly after he had a 45rpm with the highly popular Wild Records from California, as well as a follow-up album with Rhythm Bomb Records. Phillips has now gone on to consistently self-produce his own singles. We caught up with the performer to inquire about his background, as well as the evolution from his early rockabilly style, to his more 60s inspired, self-described, “Preppy Voice”.  All photographs courtesy of Lew Phillips. https://www.reverbnation.com/lewphillips  https://soundcloud.com/lewphillips   https://www.instagram.com/lewphillipsmusic/?hl=en

PONYBOY:  Lew, we first saw a video of you on YouTube a few years back and thought for sure it must be a Buddy Holly cover. And since, we’ve followed your music career. Tell us about your Canadian roots.

LEW PHILLIPS:  I actually wrote the song “Your Love” even though I was heavily influenced by the great, late Buddy Holly. I did do a cover of a Buddy Holly number during the Wild Weekender in Santa Ana, California in 2013. I grew up in a small Canadian town of Quebec’s Province called Joliette. I am basically from French-Canadian and Scottish-Canadian descendants. As a kid, I used to be sick very often and my grandparents used to babysit me all the time. That’s where I got my first “so called” musical education. My grandparents being too old for rock’n’roll, they were from the Country music generation; so the first singers I heard were Hank Snow, Hank Williams, Hank “LaRiviere” Rivers, etc…

PONYBOY:   Tell us how you first got into playing music.

LEW PHILLIPS:   As a kid, I loved to grab my grandpa’s acoustic guitar and sing along with him. So, I guess we could say that’s where it started. I thought I could become a professional hockey and baseball player, but when I finally became a teenager, I realized that was wasn’t going to happen and that I sucked anyway. So, I realized my dream to become a professional singer, songwriter and recording artist and that was it!

PONYBOY:   Your inspirations might be obvious to some, but tell us what musicians inspire you when writing and playing music.

LEW PHILLIPS:   I guess you’re not only talking about the lyrics, but the melody as well. So, here’s the ones which I think are my biggest influences, not just because they’ve been highly proclaimed and called geniuses over the years, but mostly because they helped me shape and develop my own songwriting technique. I’d say even when I was a teenager who wanted to pursue a rock ‘n’ roll/rockabilly career, I was listening to a lot of Beatles music from their Hamburg period through the Rubber Soul album. There’s something about them and their music which I can’t explain, but love it. They were using non-conventional chords for the early 1960s. When I look at Lennon and McCartney’s songs and hear them, I feel like I’m with them and know what they had to say. Each time I listen to them, I’m like, God, they knew how to write perfect lyrics with amazing melodies. So that’s why they’re very important to me. Then, there is Brian Wilson from the Beach Boys. Do I need to explain why? I mean this guy had the whole thing in his head. He could hear the whole damn song with all the instruments in his head even before he started recording it. That helped me a lot, because I’m now able to do the same thing. There’s also Phil Spector, even though he wasn’t a musical composer, but in terms of musical production he was the best. Neil Sedaka and the whole Brill Building team are also among my biggest influences, because contrary to nowadays composers in pop culture, they knew how to write some real good pop music. Finally, the great, late Buddy Holly is a guy of his own class. Just like Paul McCartney once said, he was writing his own songs, played guitar, did the solos and sang at the same time. So, if he can do it, why couldn’t we?

PONYBOY:   How would you describe your sound?

LEW PHILLIPS:  I would describe it as nostalgic music with contemporary lyrics. But if you wanna get more specific, I’d say it’s modern vintage pop music with a touch of rock ‘n’ roll, vocal harmonies and a country music beat in the back.

PONYBOY:  When we first became aware of your music, you had a single on Wild Records, and then recorded with Rhythm Bomb Records. You now self-publish your own music, correct?

LEW PHILLIPS:   That is absolutely correct! In 2015, my contract with Rhythm Bomb was about to expire in a few months and I was supposed to be making a second album for them, but I was now at a point where I felt like I no longer recognized myself in this record label. They wanted me to make a rock ‘n’ roll album and I wanted to explore and go on a personal musical journey; and they didn’t accept it. They even publicly spoke negatively about me and my decisions and they even tried to sue me. But that’s their problem. I’m doing music because that’s my reason to live. So, at first I thought I’d find another label, like a commercial one in Canada or in the United States. Then I found out life was happening with it’s reality. Nothing was happening. I wasn’t making any money. I was broke. So, finally in 2017, I decided to create my own record label just so I’d have a label to put on my records and started recording in my apartment, but still, there was a lot to learn about. Not only did I find out it was much harder to make a great sounding recording, but also that it was much harder to promote yourself and do all the things that a record label normally does for you. So I started studying and studying about recordings and social media marketing and all those dirty jobs you have to do yourself. Finally, last Spring, I realized I couldn’t do it anymore without any financial support. My fiancee told me she was going to leave me if I didn’t get a steady job to pay the bills. I got hired in a supermarket in my neighborhood and started releasing digital singles and evolving as singer, songwriter, recording artist and producer. I bought myself a new little guitar amplifier (a very cool 60s Vox reissue) and I started to think like a modern artist, because the whole game’s changed. The only similarity with the 50s or 60s is that the only way to make music is to play gigs and tour. So, I started to do my research and try to find some promoters, considering I wanted to tour the US. But I found out you somehow had to have some connections and that maybe I should do it on my own, but it takes money. And my steady job at the supermarket wasn’t paying so well, so I applied for a job at a beer company called Molson, which is the very first brewery in North America (Sorry fellas, hahaha) that a guy named John Molson founded in 1786 and they are still brewing in the same old building. So I guess the rest will be history, eh!

PONYBOY:   Your music and style has evolved from that 50s sound and look you had when you first started out. Would you say that you’ve lost some of the fans that first had an interest in you, the rockabilly crowd?

LEW PHILLIPS:   Definitely! Which is sad, but I can’t force anyone to like what I do. I’m for freedom of speech and expression, so if they don’t like what I do anymore, there’s nothing I can do. That’s just life. I mean, it happens, but life goes on. I just want to make people happy with my music, that’s all.

PONYBOY:   And what is your style of dress now? You describe yourself as “The Preppy Voice”. Do you wear primarily vintage? Are there any menswear designer’s/labels that you tend to like?

LEW PHILLIPS:  Yes! I don’t wear vintage clothes anymore. I got sick of buying old and expensive clothes only to find out months later they were good for the trash. And I don’t like the fact that some grandpas or whatever you wanna call them, wore those clothes and might have had a little accident in those pants. I know it shocks, eh! Some will say, yeah, but we wash the clothes anyway. I typically reply, that doesn’t change the fact that they’re old and used to be someone else’s clothes. So I decided I’d change my wardrobe and get some at the “Canadian Macy’s” (Hudson Bay Company) to get some brand new and cool clothes and find my own personal style. I’m a big fan of British brands like Ben Sherman, Fred Perry, Topman, but I also love brands like Ralph Lauren, Lacoste, G.H. Bass & Co., etc. I love classic labels that offer classic clothes with a bit of a vintage touch.

PONYBOY:   Tell us your thoughts and frustrations with the music industry.

LEW PHILLIPS:  I think it’s mostly when it comes to booking and gigging. I mean, I can’t speak for everywhere, but in Montreal, the music scene sucks. If you’re not in some privileged gang, they won’t let you play their bars. They won’t even reply to your emails. But, eh, no need to cry like a baby. Instead of doing so, you wash your bloody hands, get your head off the sand and work harder and try to get booked in let’s say Ontario. So then when you succeed you can show those people who refused to give you a chance that you proved them wrong. And that is what I’m planning to do.

PONYBOY:   How many records/singles do you have as of now?

LEW PHILLIPS:   I’ve released an EP on my own before Wild Records, then “Mister Colter/Silent Love” on Wild Records, and then my first album on Rhythm Bomb Records. As for on my own record label called Barking Puzzle Records, my first single was “Dreaming About Summertime”, then “Give Up”, and then “Don’t Cry”, then “Big Wide World” and finally my newest one (for the moment) is “A Taste Of Love”, which by the way you can all listen to on YouTube, bandcamp, Reverbnation and Soundcloud.

PONYBOY:   We’ve seen in some of your social media posts that you have a home based music/recording space. What does your recording process consist of?

LEW PHILLIPS:  I’m working with a soundcard, one single microphone, a couple of free plugins and the room where I’m recording as a natural echo. I don’t use any effects on guitars or any other instruments, except reverb and delay for the final mix. I do overdub tracks. I do all the instruments, except for the drums. My drummer is the session player for the drums part. Isn’t it amazing that nowadays we can do more with a computer than George Martin with The Beatles in 1964!

PONYBOY:   Being based in Montreal, do you have a fan base there? Is there a “scene” for your kind of music?

LEW PHILLIPS:   Here’s the funny thing; there is no existence of any scene related to what I do and I think it has its pros and cons. It makes my music very original, since nobody else is doing the same stuff I do. But it also means it’s very tough to get people to know me and see me play. I think it’ll take time to make it happen, but I do think at the end it’ll be worth it.

PONYBOY:   What modern day musicians do you have an affinity for?

LEW PHILLIPS:   I basically love Nick Waterhouse, Leon Bridges, Allah Las, The Molochs, Nathaniel Rateliff and the Nightsweats. I think they all have something to offer to the world and it makes me happy to see these guys enjoying some success and popularity among the pop culture. It makes me dream and gives me hope that someday this could also happen to the young Canuck man that I am.

PONYBOY:   Does being a Canadian make touring in the US difficult? Do you have any plans to tour the US or Europe in the near future?

LEW PHILLIPS:   You want me to be honest with you? Look, I love the United States. In fact, I’m a huge fan of your country. A bunch of humble men got together to build a strong and free nation. You created the modern show business industry, you can do anything you want, and you can be anyone you want to. But we, as Canadians, your northern neighbors, we have always been into the shadow of the USA. We have always had to work harder than anyone else in the music industry to prove to you that we can make it too. Now, we are starting to get more recognition from you which I’m very grateful for. But some things never change; what I’m talking about is when it comes to touring. It costs $800 for Canadian musicians to get a visa and be able to tour your country. But, on the contrary, it doesn’t cost a dime to US musicians who want to tour. All they have to do, is to sign some form and show the merchandise they want to bring with them at the Canadian borders. But, that is mainly due to the fact the Canadian government has never had any balls whatsoever, so I guess there’s nothing we can do about that other than following the rules and do the right things legally. But it definitely ain’t your fault. I am definitely planning to tour the USA and England. My two favorite countries in the world, after my own country, my dear Canada.

PONYBOY:   Finally, what plans do you have in store for your music career in the future?

LEW PHILLIPS:   I’m taking it easy. Step by step. So, now my plans are that I want to release as many singles as possible. I’m already releasing one new single each month. I also wanna grow my audience in Canada, the US and England. I want to tour Canada and the US. The final step would be to quit my steady job and make my music a living, not necessarily being a millionaire, but just being able to live a decent life and making music my main and only job.

MS. MOIRA ROE
COSMOPOLITAN RANCH GIRL

  • Ms. Moira Roe, cosmopolitan ranch girl. Ponyboy magazine New York.
  • Moira Roe wears vintage dresses in her home. Ponyboy magazine New York.
  • Ms. Moira Roe photographed in vintage western wear at her home in Toronto. Ponyboy magazine.
  • Ms. Moira Roe photographed at her home in Toronto. Ponyboy magazine NY.
  • Outfits worn by vintage western wear collector Ms. Moira Roe, photographed at her home in Toronto. Ponyboy magazine NY.
  • Vintage collector Moira Roe photographed at her home in Toronto. Ponyboy magazine NY.
  • Detail shots of Ms. Moira Roe at her home in Toronto. Ponyboy magazine NY.
  • Moria Roe in vintage western wear. Ponyboy magazine New York.
  • Photographs of Ms. Moira Roe at her home in Toronto. Ponyboy magazine New York.
  • Ms. Moira Roe photographed at her vintage decorated home in Toronto. Ponyboy magazine New York.
  • Ms. Moira Roe photographed in vintage outerwear. Ponyboy magazine New York.
  • Vintage collector Ms. Moira Roe photographed at her home in Toronto. Ponyboy magazine NY.
  • Vintage western wear clothing worn by Moira Roe. Ponyboy magazine New York.
  • Ms. Moira Roe photographed in vintage clothing at her home in Toronto. Ponyboy magazine NY.
  • Vintage western wear collector Ms. Moira Roe photographed at her home in Toronto. Ponyboy magazine NY.
  • Moria Roe photographed sitting in her vintage decorated home. Ponyboy magazine New York.
  • Ms. Moria Roe in vintage western wear. Ponyboy magazine New York.
  • Ms. Moria Roe wears collectable vintage western wear. Ponyboy magazine New York.
  • Moria Roe wears collectable vintage western wear. Ponyboy magazine New York.
  • Moria Roe wears collectable vintage 40s dresses. Ponyboy magazine New York.
  • Ms. Moria Roe wears collectable vintage 40s clothing. Ponyboy magazine New York.
  • Ms. Moria Roe wears collectable vintage scarves. Ponyboy magazine New York.
  • Ms. Moria Roe wears collectable vintage printed 40s skirts. Ponyboy magazine New York.
  • Ms. Moria Roe wears collectable vintage clothing from her personal collection. Ponyboy magazine New York.
  • Ms. Moira Roe photographed on the stairway at her home in Toronto. Ponyboy magazine New York.

MS. MOIRA ROE

COSMOPOLITAN RANCH GIRL

Meeting the super stylish Moira Roe in the sea of thousands of attendees at The Viva Las Vegas Rockabilly Weekender was a chance encounter. Poised and graceful with an understated vintage Hollywood glamour, at first glance she resembled an actress who had walked off a 1940s western movie set. And shortly after that encounter, we stumbled upon the Toronto based beauty on Instagram and knew that we must feature her on our Ponyboy site. The stunningly unique images of a meticulously dressed woman in her beautifully decorated home just demanded attention and we knew we must share them with our followers. All photography courtesy of Moira Roe. https://www.instagram.com/msmoeroe/?hl=en

PONYBOY:  Moira, we just love your unique, vintage style! When did you start buying and wearing vintage clothing?

MOIRA ROE:  Why, thank you. My first recollection would be at about 14 years of age with a group of friends who introduced me to the local Salvation Army Thrift Store in the small town I went to high school in. I remember picking out a green wool sweater without a lot of shape to it, maybe it was circa 1960s; it was during the start of the grunge era. It was a very modest start. From that point once I left country life and moved to Toronto as a student, vintage shopping became far more accessible.

PONYBOY:   Your look is very vintage western inspired. Tell us about your love for this style.

MOIRA ROE:   It could possibly be rooted in my childhood with time spent in the countryside on horseback. Later on I guess I was taken by the wardrobe and characters from the golden age of Hollywood and early TV shows. I recall being determined to find a hat styled like those worn by the six shooter toting dudettes of the silver screen. And I did. I found myself the best little Pigalle palm leaf rodeo hat at the local vintage shop. And my collection very slowly grew from there.

PONYBOY:   From what we’ve seen from your photos, we can say that you have some incredible pieces. Where do you find your clothing?

MOIRA ROE:   The advent of online shopping really helps make it possible to find unique pieces without traveling. These days I probably make most of my purchases online from Facebook, Instagram, Etsy, and Ebay. And I do also hit the local vintage shops in Toronto from time to time for some in person shopping. And trips just south of the border often turn up some good finds. Even better sometimes a seller will find me with something right up my alley. What is sold in vintage shops tends to be very regional. It’s a shame dude ranches weren’t the trend in Ontario, unlike places in the Western USA. So I don’t see much western wear show up through local estate sales, whereas there are certainly plenty of Mary Maxim sweaters to be found locally.

PONYBOY:  We saw in one of your Instagram posts a vintage pattern. Do you make some of your clothing as well?

MOIRA ROE:  I do indeed. I sew and I’m a fairly avid knitter. I am far more confident with knitting needles than a sewing machine, but if I’m really inspired to have something I will make sewing happen. In an ideal world I’d spend far more time sewing than I do. There just aren’t enough hours in the day. I commute to work on public transit, so I can easily get time in, consistently, working on a knitting project while I ride the bus or subway. It really makes the whole transit ordeal more tolerable and the time productive. My focus is on 1930s and 1940s hand knit designs.

PONYBOY:  The photos are quite extraordinary. Do you use a self-timer? Or does someone shoot them for you?

MOIRA ROE:   Thank you. I do shoot most of them myself using a timer. Although it can be kind of tricky to set up shots, I do like having complete control of the situation.

PONYBOY:   We thought for sure that you might be a stylist or designer. However that’s not the case. What’s your profession?

MOIRA ROE:   I’m glad I fooled you. As a young art school student my current job certainly is not anything I could have fathomed; working in public service as a Business Officer for film and television tax credits. Apparently you can take the girl out of art school but you can’t take the artiness out of the girl. I did work as a jeweler and goldsmith for the earlier part of my life though. In high school I always saw myself working in textiles, but when I had the opportunity to work with metal in art school my affinity for the medium took over. That being said, I’ve never really gotten over textiles.

PONYBOY:   The interiors of your home, the backdrops you use, really compliment the images. It’s up there with a highly produced fashion shoot. Did you decorate yourself with vintage finds?

MOIRA ROE:   That is truly flattering. Yes, indeed it’s my eye, handiwork and collecting all put together. I moved into my house in 2007 and over the years my collection of art and decor has evolved and many hours have been spent planning, painting, arranging, fixing, finishing, sewing, upholstering, and renovating. It’s undeniably one of my creative outlets and it continues to evolve.

PONYBOY:   You also have an Etsy account where you sell some of your finds?

MOIRA ROE:   I do indeed list items from time to time: www.etsy.com/ca/shop/MissEasyComeEasyGo

PONYBOY:   Tell us about your musician husband.

MOIRA ROE:   Sure. When Mark is not playing jazz guitar, or something on one of his many other instruments, he is teaching music classes to high school students. He is also an avid collector of old instruments and gear, and has a great appreciation for tone. I’ve unquestionably learned a thing or two from him about guitars, players, theory, history, and gear. He’s even inspired me to squeeze out a note or two, but I won’t make you listen to that.

PONYBOY:   And finally, out of all the old school design houses, who would you say is your favorite? And are there any designers now that interest you?

MOIRA ROE:   I do really admire Schiaparelli’s surrealist influenced designs. But really being a lover of western wear, Nathan Turk would be at the top of my list. I also love that he and other rodeo tailors were Jewish immigrants who brought with them their old world Eastern European tailoring skills and embroidery traditions and perfected the quality and aesthetic for Western attire. That being said, it is refreshing to see embroidery work done today by Vines of the West using an antique chainstitch machine to create designs reminiscent of the golden era of western wear.

THE LEMON TWIGS

  • Brothers Brian & Michael D'Addario photographed in New York City by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy magazine NY.
  • A portrait of Lemon Twigs musician Brian D'Addario by Alexander Thompson, for Ponyboy magazine New York.
  • Michael D'Addario on guitar, from New York City band The Lemon Twigs. Photographed by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy magazine New York.
  • Lemon Twigs musician Brian D'Addario photographed by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy magazine New York.
  • Musician Michael D'Addario, from New York City band The Lemon Twigs, photographed by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy magazine New York.
  • A detail shot of Lemon Twigs musician Brian D'Addario's checkerboard Van sneakers. Photographed by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy magazine New York.
  • Brian D'Addario on drums, from New York City band The Lemon Twigs. Photographed by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy magazine New York.
  • A portrait of Lemon Twigs musician Michael D'Addario by Alexander Thompson, for Ponyboy magazine New York.
  • Musicians Michael & Brian D'Addario, from New York City band The Lemon Twigs, photographed by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy magazine New York.
  • Michael D'Addario on drums, from New York City band The Lemon Twigs. Photographed by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy magazine New York.
  • Guitarist Brian D'Addario, from New York City band The Lemon Twigs, onstage. Photographed by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy magazine New York.
  • Musician Brian D'Addario, from New York City band The Lemon Twigs, photographed by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy magazine New York.
  • B&W portraits of Lemon Twigs musician Michael D'Addario. Photographed in New York City by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy magazine NY.
  • A close-up shot of Lemon Twigs musician Brian D'Addario at the mic, photographed by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy magazine New York.
  • Lemon Twigs musician Brian D'Addario photographed before taking the stage in New York City. Photographed by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy magazine New York.
  • A close-up shot of Lemon Twigs musician Michael D'Addario at the mic, photographed by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy magazine New York.
  • B&W portraits of Lemon Twigs musician Brian D'Addario. Photographed in New York City by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy magazine NY.
  • The Lemon Twigs photographed by Alexander Thompson, for Ponyboy magazine in New York.

THE LEMON TWIGS

LOOKOUT WORLD!

The Lemon Twigs are the fantastic new band from Long Island, New York, made up of young brothers Brian and Michael D’Addario. While very young, they’ve been playing some sort of instrument or another since they’ve been wee tykes! You may have seen them recently on TV with stints on The Tonight Show and CBS This Morning, or in a magazine with multiple photoshoots. Theres is a very hectic life indeed; constantly on the road touring, they are busy, incredibly busy. But these talented two took the time out of their crazy schedules for a quickie photoshoot and interview with Ponyboy. We are just nuts for the two of them and are glad we entered their stratosphere even for just a brief moment, on their path to taking over the rock ‘n’ roll world. Get ready for this band. We get the feeling that there’s no stopping them! Photography Alexander Thompson  http://thelemontwigs.com/

PONYBOY:  Hello, Brian and Michael. We first saw your band at a July 4th Vice music event in New York City and knew immediately that we had to feature the fantastic Lemon Twigs on our Ponyboy site! You’re brothers from Long Island. Tell us how you both started playing music at such a young age.

THE LEMON TWIGS:  Our parents were constantly playing music in the house, and it was only a matter of time before we started playing. We were never interested in anything else.

PONYBOY:   We read that your father, Ronnie D’Addario, was a musician in the 70s. That obviously affected your musical upbringing. Did he encourage you to play instruments and listen to music?

THE LEMON TWIGS:   Our father has made records at home since the 70s and still does. Both of our parents encouraged us to listen and play music. They influenced the way we play our instruments, write our songs, and our general view of music.

PONYBOY:   What was life like for you growing up in Long Island, and in high school?

THE LEMON TWIGS:   I’d imagine it’s very similar to growing up in any other suburb. In high school we weren’t really outcasts or anything, just the music kids. All of our friends from school are pretty normal. I think a normal town like ours can bore you into making music that somebody who lives somewhere exciting couldn’t make.

PONYBOY:  While other 17 and 19 year olds might be in high school or college partying with no care in the world, the two of you seem so focused and dedicated to your music. Is it hard staying on this path? Are there distractions for the both of you at such a young age?

THE LEMON TWIGS:  That was the thing about our town, there really weren’t many distractions. I know I wasn’t invited to many parties, and if I was, I usually didn’t wanna go because I’d rather be making music. The partiers didn’t like the music I liked and I didn’t want to talk about anything else. Maybe when we really enter the music business, more distractions will come; but for now, somebody just books us shows and we play them. We’re constantly just waiting to make another album.

PONYBOY:  We asked who your favorite band was during our shoot and your response was The Beach Boys. Great answer! Was that the music that was played in your household when younger? What other favorites do you have?

THE LEMON TWIGS:   The Beach Boys and The Beatles were mostly what we listened to when we were kids. I guess our all time favorites include those two bands, Big Star, Leonard Cohen, Harry Nilsson, Lou Reed, Badfinger and Procol Harum. There are plenty of others, I guess. We just know the most about these groups.

PONYBOY:   Your debut album, Do Hollywood, was recently released on 4AD Records. What was the recording process like for this record?

THE LEMON TWIGS:   We went to Jonathan Rado’s house in LA and recorded it in his garage over a week and a half. After that, Brian did the strings and brass at home and mixed it.

PONYBOY:   Jonathan Rado, from the band Foxygen, produced this record; and we also read that he discovered your band on Twitter. What was it like working with Rado on this release?

THE LEMON TWIGS:   It was totally great. We’ve worked with him quite a bit since then. He’s one of our best friends.

PONYBOY:  The harmonies are terrific, and there’s so much strength and layers in your music. How would you describe the music that you play in the Lemon Twigs to someone who has never seen or heard your band before? Is it pop? Is it rock?

THE LEMON TWIGS:  Pop/Rock.

PONYBOY:  The band has received very strong reviews from several publications. That must make you feel good.

THE LEMON TWIGS:  Well,  as of late I’ve heard the reception is more positive than negative and that makes me happy, but when it comes down to it I really only care about certain people’s opinions. If my musician friends like it, then that’s really all I need to be confident about it.

PONYBOY:  We grew up listening to the best bands on the 4AD label. How’s it been so far being on such an impressive label?

THE LEMON TWIGS:  They’ve treated us very well. I have no complaints.

PONYBOY:  Seeing The Lemon Twigs perform live is quite an explosive experience – just really exhilarating and very unique. Halfway through your set the two of you switch playing drums and guitar, and the level of energy is just so extraordinary, with the high kicks.  Are you inspired by any rock ‘n’ roll acts from the past while on stage? Or are you just feeling the music?

THE LEMON TWIGS:  I’ve taken a lot of things from The Who in terms of moves, but the truth is our favorite musicians don’t usually move as much as we do onstage. Sometimes I just get self-conscious and think that people might be bored if I just stand there, but I’m becoming confident enough in my playing to tone it down a little. That being said, it all comes from a natural place; nothing is forced. We just can move like that, feel like moving like that, and so sometimes we do.

PONYBOY:  People see that you’re both so young and stylish, and might think this early success has come easy for the both of you. Being young adds a mystique and makes people very inquisitive. Yet we’re sure this must have been somewhat of a process, with a lot of hard work, and that you’ve endured a fair amount of obstacles along the way. What’s been frustrating to you as musicians in the tough world of rock ‘n’ roll music? Do some people not want to take you seriously because of your age?

THE LEMON TWIGS:  The only thing that frustrates me about the world of rock is that I can’t record as often as I used to. I personally don’t read much of the press that comes out about us and so anything anybody says about our ages doesn’t really make its way to me. The biggest change being a sort of serious musician has brought is that our schedules are way fuller and we have a lot less time to actually write and record songs.

PONYBOY:  What would you say has been the high point in your career so far?

THE LEMON TWIGS:  Every time we get recognition from artists we love it becomes a high point.

PONYBOY:  Visually, the two of you have strong looks in your manner of dress. It’s reminiscent, back to an early 70s Bay City Roller/Bowie era. We just love it! Tell us a bit about your wonderful Glam look.

THE LEMON TWIGS:  Well, we just go through phases. Currently I’ve actually stopped wearing stuff that was too flashy, because I thought it was distracting too much from the music. I’m sure after a while I’ll change it up again.

PONYBOY:  Do you find your clothing at vintage shops? Have designer’s and clothing labels started sending you clothing yet?

THE LEMON TWIGS:  Most of our clothes are vintage. We’ve gotten some free clothes.

PONYBOY:  What do the two of you like to do in your downtime? Or is it all music, 24/7? Do you have any other interests?

THE LEMON TWIGS:  Pretty much, we just listen to music. Sometimes we go over to our friend’s house and watch wrestling.

PONYBOY:  Do you still reside in Long Island? Do you have any thoughts of relocating to New York City or Los Angeles?

THE LEMON TWIGS:  We still live on the Island. Right now we spend so much time away from home, it just doesn’t make sense to live anywhere else.

PONYBOY:  At such a young age and with a fantastic debut album, we are super excited to see and hear the evolution of not just The Lemon Twigs, but the two of you as musicians, as well. What do you expect for the future? And do you have any other aspirations besides the band?

THE LEMON TWIGS:  We just wanna make as many albums as we can. Right now we are very inspired and we just hope we can keep our excitement about writing songs as long as our heroes have.

MICHAEL
WARD

  • Michael Ward fashion illustrations. Ponyboy magazine New York.
  • Perry Ellis Spring 1980 fashion illustration by Michael Ward. Ponyboy magazine New York.
  • A fashion illustration by Michael Ward, Prada Fall 2015. Ponyboy magazine New York.
  • A fashion illustration by Michael Ward, Rochas Fall 2016. Ponyboy magazine New York.
  • Chanel Resort 2012 fashion illustration by Michael Ward. Ponyboy magazine New York.
  • Fall 2016 Ferragamo fashion illustration by Michael Ward. Ponyboy magazine New York.
  • An 80s inspired fashion illustration by Michael Ward. Ponyboy magazine New York.
  • Marc Jacobs Resort 2017 fashion illustration by Michael Ward. Ponyboy magazine New York.
  • Gucci Spring 2016 men's fashion illustration by Michael Ward. Ponyboy magazine New York.
  • Roberto Cavalli Resort 2017 fashion illustration by Michael Ward. Ponyboy magazine New York.
  • An illustration by Michael Ward. Ponyboy magazine New York.
  • Jason Wu Spring 2016 fashion illustration by Michael Ward. Ponyboy magazine New York.
  • 1960s Bill Blass fashion illustration by Michael Ward. Ponyboy magazine New York.
  • Pre-fall 2016 Gucci fashion illustration by Michael Ward. Ponyboy magazine New York.
  • Tom Ford Spring 2016 men's fashion illustration by Michael Ward. Ponyboy magazine New York.
  • Balenciaga 1958 fashion illustration by Michael Ward. Ponyboy magazine New York.
  • Kenzo Fall 2015 fashion illustration by Michael Ward. Ponyboy magazine New York.
  • Marc Jacobs Resort 2017 fashion illustration by Michael Ward. Ponyboy magazine New York.
  • An fashion illustration by Michael Ward, Givenchy Spring 2016. Ponyboy magazine New York.

MICHAEL WARD

FASHION ILLUSTRATOR

We first stumbled upon Michael Ward’s colorful fashion illustrations on Instagram.  The beautiful drawings sketched by the New York native caught our eye and we knew that we needed to share his drawings with Ponyboy readers. Ward’s no newbie to the world of New York high fashion; he has been a designer for Burberry, Rachel Zoe and Diane von Furstenberg. We look forward to seeing much more of his talented work for years to come!  https://www.instagram.com/michaelwardnyc/

PONYBOY:  Hello, Michael. We just love your fashion illustrations. To begin, tell us about your background.

MICHAEL WARD:  Hi, there! And thank you! I’m super excited to be a part of the Ponyboy world. I’m a Brooklyn born, Long Island raised New Yorker. I have a BFA in Fashion Design from Parsons School of Design, and have been a women’s fashion designer since graduation.

PONYBOY:   We read that since the age of 15 you have dabbled in fashion. Can you tell us in what aspects?

MICHAEL WARD:   I was obsessed with the world of fashion and design from an early age. High school trips to NYC and witnessing Bruce Weber/Calvin Klein billboards had me hooked. There was no turning back. I even worked at our public library to have access to Vogue Magazine. At 15, my parents brought me into Manhattan to meet with both FIT and Frank Rizzo, Fashion Chairman at Parson. Frank Rizzo was paramount to the decisions and life I am living today. I am forever grateful to him.

PONYBOY:   You have a background in design. That’s how you got into illustrating? Who have you designed clothing for?

MICHAEL WARD:   I’ve been fortunate to work for several fashion labels including a beautiful start at Carmelo Pomodoro, Burberry, Rachel Zoe, and most recently as the interim Creative Director of Diane von Furstenberg.

PONYBOY:  You’ve basically switched over from being a clothing designer to fashion illustrator. What’s the transition been like for you?

MICHAEL WARD:  Honestly, the illustration has taken on a life of its own. After DVF, I made a vow to ground myself in something I love. I decided to basically do “a sketch a day”, while looking for my next design job. It’s been such an “outside my box” experience, and quite a healthy one. I’ve loved it. Through social media, I have met some extraordinary people, artists and opportunities.

PONYBOY:    For what clients have you done illustrations?

MICHAEL WARD:  My biggest illustration job to date has been the 2016 campaign for Magic trade show in Las Vegas, Australian accessories brand Oroton (currently my illustrations are in over 42 locations in Australia, Singapore and Malaysia), Salvatore Ferragamo, Hugo Boss collection men and women, Yommme (food guru Christine Wong), and my illustrations have appeared in WWD throughout my career.

PONYBOY:  Where do you find inspiration for your illustrations?

MICHAEL WARD:   Inspiration comes from everywhere for me. I often choose a favorite look from a house or brand I respect and admire. I have also done portraits of fresh faced models from Gucci and Marc Jacobs, as well as Sonia Rykiel, Amber Valetta and Cindy Crawford. It’s a pretty cool experience having Cindy Crawford “liking” your portrait of Cindy Crawford! I am inspired by talent, raw creativity, and beauty in all forms, including photography, art, painting and theater.

PONYBOY:   And who would you say are your favorite designers?

MICHAEL WARD:   Top of my list is Dries van Noten. He has cultivated a most gorgeous world for both men and women. I love his thought process, from product to casting and presentation. He respects his craft and he respects his customers. I also have a deep appreciation and affection for Alber Elbaz. I am a huge fan of Allessandro Dell’Acqua and Peter Dundas, as well. There is a love of the craft that resonates into all they do. You can feel it.

PONYBOY:   If you could design for any fashion house, who would it be?

MICHAEL WARD:   Tough question! I loved my time with Diane von Furstenberg. She is extraordinary in every sense of the word. I would love to work with Carolina Herrera, within the changing landscape of global/American design, my eye turns toward her. I like her language, her touch.

PONYBOY:  What do you see as the next step in your career in fashion?

MICHAEL WARD:  The beautiful answer to this question is, I have no idea and am thoroughly enjoying the present.

DAVID HART
S/S 2017

  • Model Sean Swanson photographed by Alexander Thompson, backstage at the David Hart S/S17 menswear show. Ponyboy magazine NY.
  • David Hart menswear hanging on racks, photographed backstage for Spring/Summer 2017 by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy magazine NY.
  • Moscot sunglasses photographed backstage at David Hart S/S17 menswear show by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy magazine NY.
  • Close-up shot of an airbrushed t-shirt by menswear designer David Hart, photographed backstage for S/S17 by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy magazine NY.
  • Colorful Hawaiian shirts photographed on male models, backstage at David Hart S/S17 menswear show by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy magazine NY.
  • A male model in a blue David Hart S/S17 suit, photographed backstage by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy magazine NY.
  • Tom's shoes photographed backstage at David Hart S/S17 menswear show by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy magazine NY.
  • Snaps of male model's getting dressed, backstage at David Hart S/S17 menswear show. Photographed by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy magazine NY.
  • A dreaded black model wears sunglasses by Moscot, photographed backstage at David Hart S/S17 by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy magazine NY.
  • Model Trevor Drury photographed backstage at David Hart S/S17 menswear show by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy magazine NY.
  • A detail shot of a pocket square, photographed backstage at David Hart S/S17 menswear show by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy magazine NY.
  • Moscot sunglasses, snapped backstage at David Hart S/S17 menswear show by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy magazine NY.
  • Yellow vintage style banlon shirts photographed backstage at David Hart S/S17 menswear show by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy magazine NY.
  • Major model Sean Swanson photographed by Alexander Thompson, backstage at the David Hart S/S17 menswear show. Ponyboy magazine NY.
  • A Hawaiian shirt photographed on Major model Alexander Dominquez, backstage at David Hart S/S17 menswear show. Photography by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy magazine NY.
  • A model wears brightly colored Spring/Summer 2017 looks, backstage at David Hart. Photographed by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy magazine NY.
  • Detail shot of a model wearing Mascot sunglasses, backstage at the David Hart Spring/Summer 2017 menswear show. Photography by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy magazine NY.
  • Long-haired male models photographed backstage at David Hart Spring/Summer 2017 collection by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy magazine NY.
  • Detail shot of tousers and Tom's shoes, backstage at David Hart Spring/Summer 2017 menswear show. Photographed by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy magazine NY.
  • Model Yan Kai Wen from Q Models photographed backstage at David Hart S/S17 menswear show by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy magazine NY.
  • A male model photographed backstage in purple Moscot glasses, for David Hart Spring/Summer 2017 menswear show. Photography by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy magazine NY.
  • Models Sean Swanson and Kristian Smid photographed backstage at David Hart S/S17 menswear show. Photography by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy magazine NY.
  • A model in a banlon style knit and floral bermuda shorts, photographed backtage at David Hart S/S17 menswear show by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy magazine NY.
  • An afro gets styled backstage at David Hart S/S17 menswear show. Photography by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy magazine NY.
  • Male models snapped backstage at the David Hart Spring/Summer 2017 menswear show at Industria Studios. Photography by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy magazine NY.
  • Male model Kristian Smid photographed backstage at the David Hart Spring/Summer 2017 menswear collection at Industria Studios. Photography by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy magazine NY.
  • Soul Artist model Trevor Drury photographed in a David Hart S/S17 suit by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy magazine NY.
  • A male model wears Mascot sunglasses backstage at Industria Studios for David Hart's Spring/Summer 2017 menswear show. Photography by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy magazine NY.
  • Male model Max Masters photographed backstage in a David Hart Spring/Summer 2017 suit at Industria Studios. Photography by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy magazine NY.
  • Model Sean Swanson snapped backstage getting dressed at David Hart Spring/Summer 2017 menswear show at Industria Studios. Photography by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy magazine NY.
  • A neon sign on the runway at David Hart Spring/Summer collection at Industria Studios. Photography by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy magazine NY.

DAVID HART S/S 2017

SoCal SURF!

We at Ponyboy have long been fans of David Hart. In fact, we must confess that Hart is our favorite menswear designer that is shown during men’s fashion week. We just can’t wait to see what he creates every season, not just for his obvious vintage inspirations, but for the somewhat elegant twists in his collections. His designs are never too much, never over-the-top. They always remain masculine and are never feminine. He’s a designer that we would actually wear, with designs that are youthful and always nod back to some of our favorite eras, including the 50s and early 60s. So it was a great treat for us to finally cover his menswear collection for Spring/Summer 2017.

Hart’s inspiration for this season was the Southern California surfer. Perfect for summer! Hart showed two incredible blazers in a palm leaf that just made our mouths drop open – truly stupendous! He also gave us floral bermuda shorts, vintage style banlon knits, festive Hawaiian print shirts and slim 60s style pants. Yes, all things we have in our closet! And we just loved the slim suit shown with a surfboard print camp shirt. The airbrush t-shirts added another fun element, our favorite being the printed “You Dick!” tee, shown on bleach blonde model Sean Swanson, which encapsulated Hart’s sense of youthful humor. Moscot sunglasses shown with colorful lenses were the perfect accessory and added to the fun, summer feel. Photography Alexander Thompson.  http://www.davidhartnyc.com

ALL TIED UP!
VINTAGE TIES

  • Model Zach Troost from New York Model Management, stars in a vintage menswear editorial
  • Vintage menswear editorial starring male model Zach Troost, photographed by Alexander Thompson, with styling by Antonio Abrego. Men's grooming by Michael Moreno. Ponyboy magazine New York.
  • From New York Model Management, Zach Troost stars in Ponyboy magazine vintage tie editorial, photographed by Alexander Thompson, with styling by Antonio Abrego for Dated Vintage. Men's grooming by Michael Moreno.
  • Model Zach Troost stars in Ponyboy magazine vintage menswear editorial, photographed by Alexander Thompson, with styling by Antonio Abrego for Dated Vintage NY.
  • Model Zach Troost stars in Ponyboy magazine vintage menswear tie editorial, photographed by Alexander Thompson, with styling by Antonio Abrego for Dated Vintage showroom.
  • Zach Troost wears a vintage pin-up tie for Ponyboy magazine menswear editorial,
  • Model Zach Troost from New York Model Management, styled by Antonio Abrego and photographed by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy magazine NY.
  • Male model Zach Troost featured in Ponyboy magazine vintage menswear editorial, photographed by Alexander Thompson, men's grooming by Michael Moreno and stylist Antonio Abrego for Dated Vintage showroom New York.
  • Male model Zach Troost stars in Ponyboy magazine vintage menswear editorial,
  • New York Model Management talent Zach Troost, photographed for vintage menswear editorial by Alexander Thompson, with men's grooming by Michael Moreno. Stylist Antonio Abrego for Dated Vintage showroom. Ponyboy magazine NY.
  • Model Zach Troost poses for a vintage inspired menswear editorial, styled by Antonio Abrego, with men's grooming by Michael Moreno. Photographed by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy magazine New York.

ALL TIED UP!

VINTAGE TIES

Ponyboy has long been a lover of vintage silk ties. And we’ve collected more than our fair share over the years, specifically the wide, colorful and eclectic 40s silk hand painted ties, as well as the sleek, thin styles from the 1950s and early 60s. We booked male model newcomer Zach Troost, with New York Models NY, to feature some of the vibrant, vintage treasures from the archives of Dated Vintage New York. Antonio Abrego, co-owner of Dated Vintage who styled our editorial, stated, “I love the look of kitschy, vintage ties, especially ties from the 1930s to the 1950s, because the designs are fun and can set your style apart!” Photography Alexander Thompson. Men’s groomer Michael Moreno.

BOWIE
STEVE SCHAPIRO

  • Bowie, photographs by Steve Schapiro, powerHouse Books. Ponyboy magazine NY.
  • A headshot of musician David Bowie, from the book Bowie by Steve Schapiro, published by powerHouse Books. Ponyboy magazine NY.
  • From the book Bowie, photographs by Steve Schapiro, published by powerHouse Books. Ponyboy magazine NY.
  • David Bowie photographed in Los Angeles in 1974. From the book Bowie by Steve Schapiro, published by powerHouse Books. Ponyboy magazine NY.
  • A portrait of the great David Bowie, printed in the book Bowie by Steve Schapiro, published by powerHouse Books. Ponyboy magazine NY.
  • A black and white portrait of David Bowie, from the powerHouse book, Bowie by Steve Schapiro. Ponyboy magazine NY.
  • David Bowie, by photographer Steve Schapiro, from the book Bowie, published by powerHouse Books. Ponyboy magazine NY.
  • Musician David Bowie, from the book Bowie by Steve Schapiro, published by powerHouse Books. Ponyboy magazine NY.
  • David Bowie photographed in Los Angeles, from the book Bowie by Steve Schapiro, published by powerHouse Books. Ponyboy magazine NY.
  • The great David Bowie, photographed by Steve Schapiro. From the book Bowie, published by powerHouse Books. Ponyboy magazine NY.

BOWIE

PHOTOGRAPHS BY STEVE SCHAPIRO

At the very apex of David Bowie’s spectacular rise to rock ‘n’ roll fame and glory, photographer Steve Schapiro seized a rare invitation from Bowie’s manager for a private photo session with the pop star in Los Angeles in 1974. At that time, Bowie had already lived the life of Ziggy Stardust and launched Alladin Sane with albums Pin Ups and Diamond Dogs soon to come. A musical force to be reckoned with, Bowie was also widely regarded as a fashion icon, pushing the envelope of sexuality and style and having created an internationally renowned persona.

The mostly never-before-published images in Bowie (powerHouse Books, April 2016), reveal his most creative and inspired self, and present a glimpse into the intimacy that Schapiro and Bowie shared during their time together. “From the moment Bowie arrived, we seemed to hit it off. Incredibly intelligent, calm, and filled with ideas,” remembers Schapiro. “He talked a lot about Aleister Crowley, whose esoteric writings he was heavily into at the time. When David heard that I had photographed Buster Keaton, one of his greatest heroes, we instantly became friends.”

The first photo session started at four in the afternoon and went through the night until dawn. Bowie went through countless costume changes, each one seemingly befitting an entirely new and unknown Bowie persona. Most incredible, from a vantage point some 40 years later, was the costume and doodles of a particular session: Bowie dressed in blue slacks and cropped shirt, painted with diagonal white stripes, and scribbling what appears to be a diagram from the Kabbalah. They show up again in the video accompanying the song “Lazarus” on the Blackstar album.

All images from Bowie photographs by David Shapiro courtesy of powerHouse Books, 2016. http://www.powerhousebooks.com/books/david-bowie-2/

PONYBOY:  Mr. Schapiro, please tell us how you first connected with David Bowie. Were you on assignment for a magazine?

STEVE SCHAPIRO:  Actually, Bowie’s manager called me. I had worked with him before and he asked me if I’d like to do a shoot with David Bowie; and before he could finish the sentence, I said yes!

That’s how it all started really. We set up in a studio in Los Angeles in the morning, you know, lights and all, and he came later, around four in the afternoon. We were surprised, as we didn’t know what he would come as. We knew, of course, the Ziggy image from all the press at the time, which was very flamboyant. So, we were all wondering what he would come out of the dressing room dressed as.

He had actually borrowed a shirt from one of my assistants and went into the dressing room and came out twenty minutes later; and he had painted himself with these white stripes, these diagonal stripes on everything he was wearing. Even his toes where white.

And then he proceeded to draw these circles, these large circles on the background paper, and finally started writing in a little notebook, and drew on the background paper a Kabbalah graph, which was the tree of life. We didn’t  know what that was, or what he was drawing. And that was the start of our photo session.

He basically had a very strong idea what the session would be about. He brought a lot of costumes with him and I assume what he was doing was trying out different characters to see which ones would work in the future, in terms of characters for his music and tours.

PONYBOY:  Your first sitting with Bowie lasted several hours. Was it just hanging out as you snapped away? Or was it a bit more planned out?

STEVE SCHAPIRO:   It was a very relaxed session. Like I said, he came with a lot of outfits. And I would pick up my camera and want to shoot an outfit, but then he would say, “Wait a minute! I want to fix something!” and run into the bathroom and come back twenty minutes later wearing something totally different. And I would have missed the opportunity to photograph the first outfit.

PONYBOY:   From the photos in the book, we see his many fascinating personalities or characters. They seem very raw and authentic, unlike other photographer’s sessions or shoots that we’ve seen in the past.

STEVE SCHAPIRO:   I think most of the pictures that we’ve seen before were really rock ’n’ roll pictures. Most of the books really involved performance photos. I felt that this was a very personal shoot in the sense that there are a number of pictures in this book where he is looking directly in the camera, not as Ziggy Stardust the rock ‘n’ roll star, but as Davey Jones; and he seems to be exactly himself.

Basically he gave me what he really wanted to give me, and I just brought into light the things that he did. There were a few things that we collaborated on, because basically when you work with someone who is extremely talented as Bowie was, there is a collaboration, consciously or sub-consciously, unless they really don’t like to be photographed, in which case they just want to  get out of there. But in this case, it was a collaboration and I was just on the receiving end, trying to bring his ideas, you know, his persona into daylight.

Up to that point, most of what I had seen of Bowie was very much in character and very flamboyant, sexy characters. It was a surprise, a change. This basically is not a rock ’n’ roll book per se, it’s something that is much more personal to me.

PONYBOY:  Were you a fan of his music at the time? Had you ever seen him in concert or bought his records?

STEVE SCHAPIRO:   Oh, sure. Everybody in the world was a fan.

PONYBOY:  He was obviously destined to be a star, much in the vein of an Elvis or Michael Jackson. Did he have that star quality when he walked into a room? Did you feel that the first time you met him?

STEVE SCHAPIRO:   Yes, I definitely think he had that quality. Something I would say about David Bowie is that he constantly was changing. For example, the Rolling Stones and the Beatles gave us fantastic music.  But basically, in terms of their careers, and in terms of Mick Jagger, their performances were very much the same over the years. The backgrounds would change, and the music might be different, but the way Mick performs is pretty much the same, as well as the costumes he wears. They really aren’t that different.

It seems to me that Bowie, well I’m not sure if he got tired of doing the same thing or if it was a sense of personal growth, but he kept changing and growing constantly. When he felt he had done something, he would basically move on. And, you know, that to me is pure genius. It’s the way he developed his career.

For example, in the Lazarus video that he did, right before he died, he knew that he wouldn’t be around too much longer, and he went back to the same outfit. I’m actually not sure if it’s the same outfit or a reproduction, but I think it’s the two times that he actually wore that outfit.

He was very spiritual, it was obvious to me, being into the Kabbalah. A lot of this appears on Station to Station as well. Certainly at the very end he was obviously into a spiritual moment. So when I saw that he had appeared in the Lazarus video dressed that way, it just really touched me.

PONYBOY:   What are your thoughts on Bowie’s style?

STEVE SCHAPIRO:   I was surprised by the red and white stripe outfit that he wore at the shoot, which to me was a bit different. Everything to me seemed to be very directed, very disciplined in the terms of what he was trying to do with the outfits, like the motorcycle outfit. He obviously was creating a character with a specific mindset.

PONYBOY:  It’s funny you mention the motorcycle shot. That’s our favorite image from the book, him on the bike, with that pose and the headIights on. Tell us about that part of the session.

STEVE SCHAPIRO:  That motorcycle shot was the last thing that we did. The session started really at four in the afternoon and ended at four in the morning with the motorcycle shot. It was actually lit with the headlights of a car outside. And I do feel that the motorcycle series is very much into a character. We spent quite a bit of time with that outfit, taking quite a bit of photos.

PONYBOY:  We also love the black and white images of him in the trailer, with that backstage feel, him combing his hair. It has an almost Elvis quality or aura. Was that when he was filming The Man Who Fell from Earth?

STEVE SCHAPIRO:  Yes, that was on the set. And the Rolling Stone magazine cover came from that. It was just a very relaxed setting, just relaxing outside. Oh and the pellet gun! He’s not someone who would normally walk around with a gun. So, yeah, the ones that were set in the trailer were from the set of The Man Who Fell from Earth, as well as the office from the house that he was living in at the time in Los Angeles.

PONYBOY:  The People magazine cover from 1976 is just so odd, especially for the time, with the green background and his somewhat strange expression. Of course, it’s genius in so many ways. But at the time, what kind of reception did it receive from the editors and staff at People, and the general public as well?

STEVE SCHAPIRO:  Well, we were doing a series of headshots. And we both felt that a putrid green for a background color, in terms of a magazine color, would just be horrible. We said it laughing all the way. And then People magazine and other magazines used those images. So it was done in a joking way, though he was doing poses for it. It was all a joke, and it turned out to be used quite a bit.

People magazine liked it. They had a selection of pictures to use. Creem magazine had seen the pictures and used a picture, and some other magazines did as well from the session. It was just something that they had picked up on. And there’s no accounting for taste.

PONYBOY:  Ultimately, how many sessions or shoots did you have with Bowie?

STEVE SCHAPIRO:  I don’t know, probably about four or five. Well, I worked on The Man who Fell from Earth and I did the Cher show and Space Oddity show for Dick Clark. I also worked with him in terms of putting out this program for his tour called Isolar.

PONYBOY:  Were there times when you were with him holding your camera, ready to shoot or shooting, and he would just shy away from the camera or tell you to stop, basically not in the mood to be photographed?

STEVE SCHAPIRO:  No. It was always a very relaxed shoot. Basically, for most of it, I was like a fly on the wall in the sense that I was trying to shoot as quickly as possible to catch as much of what he was doing. You know he’s a performer, performing. When he was in front of the camera he was always very much in tune and aware of what he was doing. In the images he was trying to create a persona or character.

PONYBOY:  Was there a moment during a session with him where you caught him off guard and luckily snapped an image, like that famous image of Marilyn Monroe photographed by Richard Avedon, the final image from a very long sitting?

STEVE SCHAPIRO:  Yes. The shoot where his hands were in the foreground, and also the last shot in the book, which I feel have that same quality. There’s a little of that also in the black and white portrait where he’s looking at me, when he’s in the office. So in those three pictures in particular, I feel he was giving me who he was. He was going beyond the costumes. When you get to the motorcycle pictures, he’s really giving you a character, being a character. And in a lot of the other situations, he’s being a character as well.

PONYBOY:  Did you consider him your friend? Or would you say it was more of a business relationship?

STEVE SCHAPIRO:  Well, when you work with someone, basically if your’e on their wavelength, well, that’s the most important thing to be. I worked a lot for Life magazine, and you would tend to be best friends with someone when you were shooting; and you may never see them again. We didn’t play a lot of cards together.

PONYBOY:  When was the last time that you saw him or spoke to him? Were you aware that he was sick?

STEVE SCHAPIRO:  No. I don’t think really anybody knew. He hid it quite well. I mean everyone knew that he had the heart attack and he sort of slowed down after that. But I don’t think that anyone knew, besides a very small circle of people. I felt that a little in October of 2015, when we were first putting the book out. We got this message back from him, from his assistant, that he wished us well on the project and that he hoped to see it in April of 2016.

I think it was in 1985 that he called me out of the blue and asked me if I would shoot his tour. And I had not heard from him for a while. And he called me literally fifteen minutes before I was walking to go out the door with my wife and son to go on a much needed, overdue vacation to Paris. There was no way I could do the tour. We were just about to get on the plane. I would have loved to have done it. But there was no way I could do that.

PONYBOY:  The book with powerHouse sold out in two days. And it’s already in it’s second printing, to be released in June. Had you always planned on having a book on Bowie? Did his death bring out the release of the book?

STEVE SCHAPIRO:  I started planning the book in August 2015, and by October we were definitely doing the book. We were first planning on bringing it out in April, then thought of putting it out later in the year, in 2016. And then when he died, we immediately started putting everything together and the focus definitely changed much more to the Kabalah pictures. And I had received an email from Albin, which became the text for the beginning of the book, which brought into sight the spiritual side of him and his interest in the Kabalah. That immediately became the primary focus of the book, I would say.

PONYBOY:  You’ve photographed so many famous, extraordinary people from Bobby Kennedy and Marlon Brando to Andy Warhol and Edie Sedgwick at the Factory. Iconic images that remain embedded in our brains, like the image of a young Jodie Foster from the set of Taxi Driver. But what impact did David Bowie make on your life, from your sessions with him?

STEVE SCHAPIRO:  The impact that he made on me is that he impressed me from the beginning as someone who had a very spiritual nature underneath the costumes and the performances he was doing. And he also seemed to have a timeline of what he was doing, to be developing in his mind a sequence of events, of characters. So, all of that very much impressed me. And his personality, of course, impressed me in a very strong way.

He was obviously very brilliant. It was just a joy and a pleasure working with someone who had all those qualities. You work with a lot of people where you have to pull pictures out of them, and where you’re not getting very much content, not getting a lot out of them.

The spirit of the person is what I’m after as a photographer. Bowie certainly brought that through. When you work with someone like that, it’s an exhilarating moment.

PONYBOY:  One last question for you, Mr. Schapiro. There’s an amazing black and white photograph that we saw on the internet of you running with 7 or 8 cameras around your neck and shoulders. Does that image sum up your life as a journalistic photographer?

STEVE SCHAPIRO:  That picture is from the Bobby Kennedy campaign. And, yes, that was pretty much my life. It was not knowing where you were gonna be from day to day. I was never on the staff of Life magazine, but I was probably working more than any of their staff photographers. I moved very quickly from one thing to another.

I worked with Sports Illustrated, the Mohammed Ali pictures. I did covers for most magazines, like Time, Newsweek, etc. You were a journalistic photographer and you did the best you could. Film rolls were sent overnight to the Life lab. And you wouldn’t see them until they were in the magazines, because you were moving around so much. You might not get your contact sheets back until much later. You did not know you were involved in history of any sort or anything like that. Your entire focus was on if the photos would run in the magazine the following week, if they were good enough, and if they would use them. There weren’t really any photo galleries at the time. It was a very different period of time.

The sixties were basically the great age of journalistic photography. You had access. There were no public relations people to get in your way. And, basically, the photos got used in a great way. There were a lot of great picture magazines, and you could find a lot that would support your work at that time. All of that’s changed very much.

VINTAGE TATTOO FLASH
JONATHAN SHAW

  • Vintage Tattoo Flash by Jonathan Shaw, published by Powerhouse Books. Ponyboy magazine NY.
  • Vintage tattoo flash from the newly released publication by Powerhouse Books, Vintage Tattoo Flash by Jonathan Shaw. Ponyboy magazine NY.
  • Old school tattoo flash from the newly released publication by Powerhouse Books, Vintage Tattoo Flash by Jonathan Shaw. Ponyboy magazine NY.
  • Old tattoo flash from the newly released publication by Powerhouse Books, Vintage Tattoo Flash by Jonathan Shaw. Ponyboy magazine NY.
  • Tattoo flash from the newly released publication by Powerhouse Books, Vintage Tattoo Flash by Jonathan Shaw. Ponyboy magazine NY.
  • Flash from the newly released publication, Vintage Tattoo Flash by Jonathan Shaw, from Powerhouse Books. Ponyboy magazine NY.
  • From the newly released publication, Vintage Tattoo Flash by Jonathan Shaw, from Powerhouse Books. Ponyboy magazine NY.
  • Old school tattoo flash of babies, from the newly released publication, Vintage Tattoo Flash by Jonathan Shaw, from Powerhouse Books. Ponyboy magazine NY.
  • Old school tattoo flash of a mermaid, from the newly released publication, Vintage Tattoo Flash by Jonathan Shaw, from Powerhouse Books. Ponyboy magazine NY.
  • Tattoo flash from the newly released publication, Vintage Tattoo Flash by Jonathan Shaw, from Powerhouse Books. Ponyboy magazine NY.
  • Old tattoo flash, from the newly released publication, Vintage Tattoo Flash by Jonathan Shaw, from Powerhouse Books. Ponyboy magazine NY.
  • Tattoo flash of horses, from the collection of Jonathan Shaw's publication Vintage Tattoo Flash from Powerhouse Books. Ponyboy magazine NY.
  • Old school tattoo flash, from the newly released publication, Vintage Tattoo Flash by Jonathan Shaw, from Powerhouse Books. Ponyboy magazine NY.
  • Personal photos of tattoo artist Jonathan Shaw. Ponyboy magazine NY.
  • Personal photographs of tattoo artist Jonathan Shaw. Ponyboy magazine NY.

VINTAGE TATTOO FLASH

JONATHAN SHAW

“Tattoo flash” is the term for the printed or hand-drawn tattoo designs found on the walls and binders of tattoo shops that walk-in customers can select from. Flash is either drawn by individual tattoo artists for display in their own shops, or traded for or bought from other artists and distributors. Once exclusively hand-drawn, original tattoo flash has largely been replaced by professional “flash artists” who sell prints of copyrighted flash at tattoo conventions and online. Vintage, hand-drawn flash is incredibly difficult to come by, and collectors and enthusiasts alike devour any new discoveries of long-lost original flash.

Renowned outlaw tattooist and author Jonathan Shaw owns one of the largest collections of vintage tattoo flash in the world, and Vintage Tattoo Flash is an incredibly rich overview of the early years of American flash art. Vintage Tattoo Flash spans the first roughly 75 years of American tattooing from the 1900s Bowery to 50s Texas, and from the Pike in the 60s to the development of the first black and grey, single-needle tattooing in LA in the 70s. The book lovingly reproduces entirely unpublished sheets of original flash from the likes of Bob Shaw, Zeke Owen, Tex Rowe, Ted Inman, Ace Harlyn, Ed Smith, Paul Rogers, the Moskowitz brothers, and many, many others relatively known and unknown.

Electric tattooing as we know it today was invented in New York City at the turn of the 19th century. In the first days of American tattooing, tattoos were primarily worn by sailors and soldiers, outlaws and outsiders. The visual language of what came to be known as “traditional tattooing” was developed in those early days on the Bowery and catered to the interests of the clientele. Common imagery that soon became canon included sailing ships, women, hearts, roses, daggers, eagles, dragons, wolves, panthers, skulls, crosses, and popular cartoon characters of the era. The first tattooists also figured out that using bold outlines, complimented by solid color and smooth shading, was the proper technique for creating art on a body that would look good forever. In the over 100 years since then, techniques and styles have evolved, and the customer base has expanded, but the core subject matter and philosophy developed at the dawn of electric tattooing has persisted as perennial favorites through the modern era.

Jonathan Shaw is a world traveling outlaw artist, novelist, blogger, head doctor, anti-folk hero, whorehouse philosopher, legendary tattoo master, and notorious innovator and creator of underground art. Shaw was born in NY to big band legend Artie Shaw and movie star Doris Dowling, and was raised in LA where he learned to tattoo on the legendary Pike boardwalk from old-school California masters. After running with the likes of Jim Morrison, the Manson Family, and Charles Bukowski, he fell prey to heroin addiction and a life of crime. He finally left 1970s Hollywood to travel the world and founded Fun City, the first street tattoo shop in NYC since tattooing was decriminalized in the 1960s.

All artwork and photographs courtesy of Jonathan Shaw and Powerhouse Books. http://www.powerhousebooks.com/books/vintage-tattoo-flash-100-years-of-traditional-tattoos-from-the-collection-of-jonathan-shaw/  http://www.jonathanshawworks.com

PONYBOY:  Jonathan, you probably do not remember us, but we met you in the late 90s, when you were on your badass motorcycle, with a twenty-something-year-old babe on the back, perhaps on St. Marks street? Does this sound about right?

JONATHAN SHAW:  Sure. Sounds like a typical day in the life for me back in the New York days. I was usually on a motorbike, and usually with some chick hanging on the back. Still am, come to think of it (laughs).

PONYBOY:  When did you start collecting vintage tattoo flash?

JONATHAN SHAW:   Sometime in the early 80s, but it really picked up speed to become a minor obsession in the late 80s, then even more so into the 90s when I was traveling around the world as Managing Editor of a big tattoo magazine, interviewing a lot of the old time tattoo artists.

PONYBOY:   Did you initially just stumble upon it? And was it somewhat easy to acquire, or did it take a lot of digging and research?

JONATHAN SHAW:   It was mostly organic, being that I was around it so much back in the day. Over the decades of my tattoo career, especially working with the magazine and writing all these articles about tattoo history, I got to know many of the old school tattoo masters pretty well. A lot of them became close friends and associates. I ended up working with some of them in tattoo shops around the world, especially in the US, legendary guys like Bob Shaw and Col. Todd, Spider Webb, Crazy Ace, Gill Monte and so on. So the “digging and research” you refer to was really just part of my everyday tattooing environment. All in a day’s work, so to speak.

PONYBOY:  Was your intention of buying the flash for reference, as a tattoo artist? Or did you aspire to be a collector?

JONATHAN SHAW:  Like I said, it was basically just part of the scenery in my life as a tattoo man. Back in the day, old hand-painted tattoo flash like this was much more commonplace in the tattoo world than it is today. It was everyday reference material for most of us, and you saw it everywhere. The “collecting” just sort of happened over the years as the stuff became more scarce and sought after.

Tattooing is a popular art form, always has been. As such, the designs change and evolve according to public demand. The material you see on shop walls is basically dictated by popular tastes. New iconography started being introduced into the mix by newer upcoming tattooists sometime around the mid 70s, catering to the changing popular tastes of the time. The old stuff that had been the bread and butter for the old school tattoo guys for so many decades was quickly becoming obsolete. Much of this stuff was on its way to the dumpster when I started acquiring it. A lot of it was actually given to me, and even the stuff I did pay money for was sold at a very nominal cost. Most of these old school guys couldn’t get their heads around why anybody would even want it. To them, it was just obsolete shop material. Unsellable crap. You’ve gotta understand that for someone whose stock-in-trade is selling tattoos, if a design doesn’t sell anymore, from their point of view it’s basically worthless.

But I loved the old tattoo designs, always had, ever since I was a little kid. And I had a very strong intuition that someday it would make up a really cool, valuable archive. So I just started amassing boxes and boxes of the stuff, picking up more and more in my travels and interactions with the old timers and constantly adding to the collection. One day I woke up to realize I was sitting on priceless archives of vintage Americana, a really important documentation of folk art history. But I never consciously set out with that intention. Like most good things in life, it just fell together and happened on its own.

PONYBOY: The collection is quite overwhelming – the colors, the crudeness, and of course, the subject matter. Where do you keep your entire collection of over 300 pieces?

JONATHAN SHAW:  It’s actually over 3,000 pieces, and where I keep it is none of your fucking business! (Laughs). It used to be stored in Johnny Depp’s compound, but I moved it to a more secure location a few years ago. Let’s just say it’s under lock and key in a very safe climate-controlled storage facility, guarded by vicious man-eating Rottweilers and heavily armed thugs (laughs).

PONYBOY:  What would you say is the oldest piece of flash that you own? And who is the artist?

JONATHAN SHAW:    Most of the oldest stuff is from around the turn-of-the-century, going through the early 1900s. The rarest old stuff is by the famous British tattoo artist George Burchett, who wrote one of the most interesting pieces of early tattoo literature, a great book called Memoirs of a Tattooist. The oldest American tattoo flash mostly comes from the old Bowery tattoo shops, specifically from a guy named Ed Smith, one of the greatest early draftsmen in tattoo history.

PONYBOY:  I’m sure your collection is invaluable. Have you ever had it appraised? And if you don’t mind us asking, what would be the value?

JONATHAN SHAW:   Make me an offer of over a million dollars for the lot and we can talk. It would be a great investment for someone who could afford an expenditure like that, since it’s certainly bound to go way up in value in the years to come, especially given tattooing’s current popularity and acceptance by established art world opinion makers.

PONYBOY:   What artist’s work is most prominent in your collection? And can you name a favorite artist from the collection?

JONATHAN SHAW:   I already mentioned Ed Smith. There’s a lot of his stuff, and it’s definitely some of the best stuff, artistically. It’s also some of the oldest and rarest stuff. Smith was an amazing draftsman, maybe the best of his day. There’s also a lot of great old vintage tattoo flash from early tattoo masters like Bert Grimm, Bob Shaw, Ace Harlyn, Zeke Owen, etc. The prominent names go on and on, but overall, my favorite stuff is definitely drawn by Ed Smith from the old Bowery shop.

PONYBOY:  Do you have any plans on exhibiting this extraordinary collection?

JONATHAN SHAW:  Oh, yeah! That’s been the plan all along. We did a couple of very successful and well-attended art shows back in the early 90s at galleries in New York and Hollywood, back to back. I remember the first big show was done at a gallery in NYC. We were totally shocked and unprepared for the kind of crowds it drew. They had to set up police barricades around the whole block by the gallery to keep order on the night of the opening. It was insane.

That’s when I first began to see the kind of power this stuff had to bring people out of the woodwork. The next show was on the West Coast in Hollywood about a year later. Same big crowds, same mad interest. You had all these big name movie stars and rock stars showing up to gawk at the artwork. After those first shows, I got busy with other projects, tattooing and working with the magazines, traveling the world tattooing, and the work all went back into storage. And that’s where it’s stayed until now. We’re kicking off this new book launch with a 2-day only exhibition at La Luz de Jesus Gallery in Los Angeles. It’s actually one of the original galleries where we did one the first shows back in the 90s. A lot of the best artwork from the book will be on display there on Tuesday & Wednesday, May 3rd/4th, and I’ll be over there signing books on both days from around 6-9pm. The legendary American painter Robert Williams, who wrote the book’s introduction, will be in attendance as well, along with God knows who else might show up. Should be an interesting event.

PONYBOY:  How did the idea of the book come about?

JONATHAN SHAW:  After the original art shows back in the 90s, there was much talk about doing a book. Robert Williams himself was one of the early supporters of the idea. There was this one guy (who will remain unnamed) who sat on the material for like 8 years, promising to get us a book deal with a big publisher, but it never happened. Then, Johnny Depp came along and said he wanted to publish it, and even offered to sponsor a traveling museum show. Ironically, right after Depp came into it, the other guy finally came back with an offer from Rizzoli. But it was too late. At that point I was already sick of waiting for him, so of course I made a commitment with Depp to do the thing, seemed like the best way to go at the time. Well, Depp ended up dropping the ball too, and then I was right back where I started. No book. Life went on. I was busy with a thousand other projects, so the book idea just went on the back burner and stayed there for a long time.

Meanwhile, I retired from tattooing and started writing other books. HarperCollins picked up my first novel, NARCISA, and released it under Johnny Depp’s imprint and that was a big deal for me as a writer, my first real mainstream success. That’s when this tattoo book idea came back into the picture. I’d finally signed with a literary agent to oversee the HarperCollins deal. After that was in the bag, he asked me what else I had and I told him about the Flash book. He shopped the concept to a few different publishers and came back with a decent offer from Powerhouse. I’d already done a couple of book signing events with them over the years for some of my works of fiction, and I knew them to be a good solid operation, so it all came together pretty effortlessly once the deal was signed and delivered.

PONYBOY:  At what age did you get into tattooing?

JONATHAN SHAW:  I first got into it in my early 20s, but I’d been fascinated with the art since I was a little kid. I didn’t start to work professionally fulltime until I was almost 30, but I’d already been steeped in the culture and the art for over a decade. I’m 63 years old now, so I guess you could say I’ve been in and around tattooing for most of my life – certainly all my adult life.

PONYBOY:  You made your mark as the premiere tattoo artist in the country in the mid 90s, tattooing celebrities like Johnny Deep and Iggy Pop. Were these friends of yours? Or did they just happen to stumble into your shop because of your name?

JONATHAN SHAW:  Well, the “celebrity clientele” wasn’t what I wanted when I first started tattooing. Never, man! I mean, yeah, the business was good and all that, but then it all just started getting kinda stupid, y’know. Hoards of all these real middle-America types coming in from all over the place, and they weren’t even coming to me for the quality of the work, but just because I was the guy who tattooed all these famous people. It coulda’ been anybody for all they cared. The good old herd mentality. Most of these fuckers didn’t know enough about tattooing to care, they just wanted the status of that whole, ‘I got tattooed by the famous guy who did so-and-so’s shit’.

But yeah, word-of-mouth got the ball rolling, and next thing I knew I was going on Letterman and getting visits from Iggy Pop, Johnny Depp, The Cure, Shane MacGowan, Dee Dee Ramone, Marilyn Manson, Jim Jarmusch, Johnny Winter, Kate Moss, Orlando Bloom, Kathy Acker, Tupac Shakur and all his bitches. The VIP list goes on. Even Vanilla Ice was lining up for an appointment, much to my embarrassment. But hey, it was the 90s, right? Everyone who was anyone – or thought they were – was clamoring for ink from me back then. Some of them I’d known before I became a brand name, people like Iggy and Johnny. Others I got to know through tattooing, like Jarmusch. A few of these guys became lifelong friends. There were others I never saw again. People tend to come and go around tattooing, which has always been an essentially transient art form.

The lifestyle is pretty much part of an outsider culture, at least it was back then. In that sense, there was always a certain bond of complicity between someone like me as this outsider artist and all these eccentric off-the-wall artistic minded celebrity types. Life in the fast lane and all that, it all just kinda went hand-in-hand, like beans and rice (laughs).

PONYBOY:  You retired from tattooing over fifteen years ago. What brought about this decision, to give up your very successful trade?

JONATHAN SHAW:  The answer’s pretty simple. I just needed a new outlet, a means of expression for all my adventures, thoughts, dreams, nightmares and visions; a vehicle for the kind of personal exorcisms and explorations most people can relate to at their core, but rarely have the balls, drive or talent to take to the limit. After over 3 decades in the tattoo world, I desperately needed a more authentic medium, artistically. You can’t do something halfway if you’re gonna be any good at it. I learned that from tattooing all those years.

So I set my goal to be a writer and I wanted to be a good one. I knew that would take total focus and dedication, No more time for tattooing, so I gave it all up to write. But I’d already had enough of dealing with the mainstream public and their increasingly corny, narcissistic demands. So after decades in the chair, it was just time to move on. Even though I lived and breathed tattooing back in the day, on some levels I guess there was always this perverse part of me that never let me feel I fit in with the crowd. Any crowd. It was no different with this so-called Tattoo Industry I suddenly found myself at the center of. See, I was pretty much orphaned by alcoholism in my family of origin, so from an early age I was kinda raised by wolves, running the streets of Hollywood and New York City, hitchhiking around the country and living on the edge. Eventually, I took to the road in Mexico and South America, working on ships and traveling the world, and I never really looked back. I was on my own from about the age of twelve, so my real family and school were always the streets, bikers, beatniks, winos, weirdos, druggies, hustlers, criminals and whores. Those good people were the only people who had tattoos back then, outsiders, y’know, and they taught me important lessons in the art of survival.

So I really didn’t come to tattooing so much for the art as I did because of the outsider lifestyle that surrounded the whole deal. For me, the artistic part came later. Much later. Eventually, it all just jumbled together and took over my life, like a kinda weird fucked up Frankenstein monster creation. But when tattooing started turning into a big mainstream “Industry” kinda thing, I knew it was time to put it behind me and really follow my dreams of being a writer.

PONYBOY:  Do you still own a tattoo shop?

JONATHAN SHAW:  I write and I travel. A couple of years ago I rode a motorcycle across South America all alone. These days I hang out with my girlfriend and a few other close friends in an artistic and spiritual community that I love and can relate to. But wherever I go and whatever I’m doing, my main focus is always my writing projects.

My last book was called NARCISA – OUR LADY OF ASHES. It came out on HarperCollins last year, and it did pretty well, got hundreds of 5-Star reviews on Amazon. Rolling Stone Magazine even called me “the next Bukowski” (laughs). NARCISA was a work of fiction, nothing to do with tattooing, which surprised a lot of people who only knew me as this famous tattoo guy. But I’m having a really good time with writing and I wouldn’t change a thing. I’m a much happier person since I quit the scab trade and started writing these books fulltime. Suits my lifestyle a lot better. The first volume of a 5-volume tattoo memoir series is coming out early next year on Turner Publishing with a really cool original cover by R. Crumb. It’s called SCAB VENDOR – CONFESSIONS OF A TATTOO ARTIST. It’s eventually gonna be released in several volumes, should I live long enough to finish ‘em all. It’s been a real interesting life, to say the least, in and out of tattooing, so it would be almost criminally selfish of me not to write about it and share all those crazy fucked up stories and experiences with the world.

PONYBOY:  It states in your book that this is the first volume of Vintage Tattoo Flash. Do you plan on more books?

JONATHAN SHAW:  Oh yeah. There’s enough material in this collection to put out another 5 to10 volumes, so I guess we’ll just see how well this one does for the publisher. If it sells fast and makes them oodles of money, as I predict it will, I’m sure they’ll want to keep putting this stuff out there till the cows come home. And when they do, I’m ready to roll with it.

PONYBOY:  Finally, what are your thoughts on the state of modern day tattooing? It’s become so mainstream, and they say that perhaps almost twenty percent of the American population has a tattoo.

JONATHAN SHAW:  (Laughs) Before the whole Tattoo Reality Show thing started, some big Hollywood mucky-muck producer approached me with an offer to head up the first one. I turned him down flat. Some people would say I really missed the boat on that one, but hey, I didn’t wanna be on that fucking boat. For me, it was like being offered a luxury stateroom on the fucking Titanic. No way was I gonna waste any more of my life pandering to the lowest common denominator of public taste. Tattooing used to be something cool and edgy, but when it became a respectable mainstream gig, it lost a lot of its beauty for people like me. Even as it attained greater levels of public approval, a certain mediocrity crept into the thing. You know, the public can be a real shit-eating monster. Just look at all the vapid horseshit they’re putting out on television and the movies these days! And the public just eats it up! It’s fucking pathetic. Shit, man, that’s basically why I got out of commercial tattooing, to get away from catering to the mainstream public’s overwhelming bad taste. Let somebody else do that shit. I got lots of really radical stories to tell, and like my old man always said, “time is all you’ve got”, so I decided to use what’s left of my time on earth doing something better suited to my soul’s demands than slinging scabs on a basically moronic public for cash and prizes. I’m sure I’m not gonna make a lot of friends by talking like this about the modern tattoo renaissance, but hey, I’ve paid my fucking dues and, what the fuck, you just had to ask (laughs)…

BOOK SIGNING:

La Luz de Jesus Gallery  4633 Hollywood Blvd, Los Angeles, CA 90027

 May 3rd & 4th, 2016 from 6-9pm.

Click here to view the press release.
For more information, please contact Jonathan Shaw at jsfuncity@gmail.com

MAISON KITSUNÉ
F/W 2016

  • The latest Maison Kitsuné menswear lookbook, for Fall/Winter 2016, by photographer Pierpaolo Ferrari. Pony boy magazine NY.
  • The Fall/Winter 2016 menswear lookbook for Maison Kitsuné. Photographed by Pierpaolo Ferrari. Pony boy magazine NY.
  • F/W16 menswear lookbook for Maison Kitsuné. Photographed by Pierpaolo Ferrari. Pony boy magazine NY.
  • Fall/Winter 2016 menswear lookbook for Maison Kitsuné. Photographed by Pierpaolo Ferrari. Pony boy magazine NY.
  • The F/W16 menswear lookbook for Maison Kitsuné. Photographed by Pierpaolo Ferrari. Pony boy magazine NY.
  • F/W 2016 menswear lookbook for Maison Kitsuné. Photographed by Pierpaolo Ferrari. Pony boy magazine NY.
  • The Fall/Winter 2016 Maison Kitsuné menswear lookbook, photographed by Pierpaolo Ferrari. Pony boy magazine NY.
  • The latest Maison Kitsuné menswear lookbook, for Fall/Winter 2016. Photographed by Pierpaolo Ferrari. Pony boy magazine NY.
  • The latest Maison Kitsuné menswear lookbook, for F/W16. Photographed by Pierpaolo Ferrari. Pony boy magazine NY.
  • The latest Maison Kitsuné menswear lookbook, for F/W16, by photographer Pierpaolo Ferrari. Pony boy magazine NY.

MAISON KITSUNÉ F/W 2016

“LOVE RISES” MEN’S COLLECTION

From the imagination of co-founders and creative directors Gildas Loaëc and Masaya Kuroki, Maison Kitsuné pays homage to its Japanese heritage this Fall-Winter 2016 season.

With the aesthetic and dreamscape created by Hayao Miyazaki in acclaimed, animated film The Wind Rises, the collection takes off for distant shores in 1930s aviary fashion.

The << Love Rises >> men’s collection introduces Japanese silhouettes, comfortable, cool and elegant in shades of navy blue and gray with green, which are brought to life in dashes of bright blue, mauve and red. In a combination of daring colors and motifs, patchwork further the palette for an exciting, juxtaposed effect.

Materials also return to native lands in organic textiles: cotton, flannel, broadcloth and velvet.

Icons of Mount Fuji and the Rising Sun recur among pop prints – in aviator or camouflage – in playful celebration of the casual, chic edge that defines the Maison Kitsuné man.

Finally classic, season-to-season styles are revisited and meticulously redone: the bomber jacket is envisioned in raw- edge felted wool; the aviator jacket adopts technical twill with a faux shearling collar; and the duffle coat goes incognito with camouflage jacquard broadcloth.

 Photography Pierpaolo Ferrari.

 WWW.MAISONKITSUNE.FR

6-PACK
FUSION MEN

  • 6-pack Fusion men, photographed by Alexander Thompson, with men's grooming and art direction by Walton Nunez. Ponyboy magazine NY.
  • Fusion male model Griffin Reed stars in 6-pack Fusion men, photographed by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy magazine NY.
  • Fusion male model newcomer Griffin Reed stars in 6-pack Fusion men, photographed by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy magazine NY.
  • Fusion agency newcomer Griffin Reed stars in 6-pack Fusion men, photographed by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy magazine NY.
  • Fusion male model Ian Weglarz stars in 6-pack Fusion men, photographed by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy magazine NY.
  • Fusion male model newcomer Ian Weglarz stars in 6-pack Fusion men, photographed by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy magazine NY.
  • Fusion model Ian Weglarz stars in 6-pack Fusion men, photographed by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy magazine NY.
  • Fusion male model Turner Barbur stars in 6-pack Fusion men, photographed by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy magazine NY.
  • Fusion male model newcomer Turner Barbur stars in 6-pack Fusion men, photographed by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy magazine NY.
  • Fusion model Turner Barbur stars in 6-pack Fusion men, photographed by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy magazine NY.
  • Fusion male model Matthew Sosnowski stars in 6-pack Fusion men, photographed by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy magazine NY.
  • Fusion male model newcomer Matthew Sosnowski stars in 6-pack Fusion men, photographed by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy magazine NY.
  • Fusion model Matthew Sosnowski stars in 6-pack Fusion men, photographed by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy magazine NY.
  • Fusion male model Omar Ahmed stars in 6-pack Fusion men, photographed by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy magazine NY.
  • Fusion male model newcomer Omar Ahmed stars in 6-pack Fusion men, photographed by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy magazine NY.
  • Fusion model Omar Ahmed stars in 6-pack Fusion men, photographed by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy magazine NY.
  • Fusion male model Seth Wilkerson stars in 6-pack Fusion men, photographed by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy magazine.
  • Fusion male model newcomer Seth Wilkerson stars in 6-pack Fusion men, photographed by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy magazine NY.
  • Fusion model Seth Wilkerson stars in 6-pack Fusion men, photographed by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy magazine NY.

6-PACK

FUSION MEN

Fusion is a boutique modeling agency based in New York City featuring high-end men and women. These models not only walk the runways all over the world, but they also pose for the best clothing campaigns and are featured in edgy magazine editorials. Fusion has been an integral part in launching the careers of many young and in demand male models, including Charlie James, Matts van Snippenberg, Laurie Harding and Max von Isser, just to name a few.

It was men’s groomer/art director Walton Nunez’s concept to purchase a 6-pack of classic white t-shirts and feature Fusion newcomers, who are on their way to making their mark in the male modeling world. Walton stated, “When I reached out to Ponyboy to do this story, I wanted to capture the essence of each model. I really wanted to make pictures of the boys that were going to be the next generation of models, in a monochromatic setting. The focus is on the movement each model brings to the picture being taken of him. I wanted to make images that were art focused, yet fashion oriented. What looks better on any man than a white t-shirt? Well, I guess a leather jacket over that, but perhaps that’s our next story!”

We present to you the next wave, which includes Griffin Reed, Ian Weglarz, Turner Barbur, Matthew Sosnowski, Omar Ahmed and Seth Wilkerson. Photography Alexander Thompson.  http://www.fusionmodelsnyc.com

GRIFFIN REED

PONYBOY:  What’s your age, place of origin and Instagram?

GRIFFIN REED:  20, Oakland, Ca. https://www.instagram.com/im.natas/

PONYBOY: How did you get into modeling?

GRIFFIN REED:   A freak accident. A photographer asked to shoot me for trade. The trade was a burrito, and that photo is still used as my comp card to this day!

PONYBOY:   What’s been your favorite shoot to work on so far?

GRIFFIN REED:   A Van’s campaign. I got to be a hooligan through Seattle for three days! Plus the catering and dinners were insane.

PONYBOY:  What’s your dream campaign?

GRIFFIN REED:   Prada or Dior.

PONYBOY:  What designers do you favor?

GRIFFIN REED:  Not that I can afford or wear any of it, but Prada or Dior. Everytime I get the chance to put on anything from them I feel on top of the world. There’s something to say about how an outfit can completely change your attitude!

PONYBOY:  What other interests do you have besides modeling?

GRIFFIN REED:    Skateboarding, drinking coffee, and singing/screaming sad boy, bedroom music.

IAN WEGLARZ

PONYBOY:  What’s your age, place of origin and Instagram?

IAN WEGLARZ:  I’m 20 years old. I’m from Detroit, Michigan. My instagram is: https://www.instagram.com/iianweglarz/

PONYBOY:  How did you get into modeling?

IAN WEGLARZ:   People just kept taking pictures of me for their projects back home, and it kinda took a crazy turn from there.

PONYBOY:   What’s been your favorite shoot to work on so far?

IAN WEGLARZ:   That’s hard, there have been a few. I’d have to say anything I do with Hadar Pitchon, a shoot I did in Rhode Island with Marcus Cooper and Lisa Jarvis, or a recent one with Matthew Kristall.

PONYBOY:  What’s your dream campaign?

IAN WEGLARZ:   Probably something like Saint Laurent or something out of my usual looks, like Gucci or Prada.

PONYBOY:  What designers do you favor?

IAN WEGLARZ:  Obviously Saint Laurent. But I’ve been loving things from Fear Of God and the suits by David Hart.

PONYBOY:  What other interests do you have besides modeling?

IAN WEGLARZ:    I am a poet always and for eternity. Words that feel good on the tongue causes me to feel euphoria. I also sing a lot. But recently I have been getting into different creative mediums like drawing and styling.

TURNER BARBUR

PONYBOY:  What’s your age, place of origin and Instagram?

TURNER BARBUR:  18, Nebraska. https://www.instagram.com/faglite/

PONYBOY: How did you get into modeling?

TURNER BARBUR:   I was scouted at a Starbucks in Soho.

PONYBOY:   What’s been your favorite shoot to work on so far?

TURNER BARBUR:   Interview Magazine with Craig McDean and Karl Templer.

PONYBOY:  What’s your dream campaign?

TURNER BARBUR:   Prada.

PONYBOY:  What designers do you favor?

TURNER BARBUR:  Raf Simons, Jonathan Anderson, Rei Kawakubo, and many more.

PONYBOY:  What other interests do you have besides modeling?

TURNER BARBUR:    I like to act and watch movies, as well as reading and writing.

MATTHEW SOSNOWSKI

PONYBOY:  What’s your age, place of origin and Instagram?

MATTHEW SOSNOWSKI:   17, New Jersey.  https://www.instagram.com/mattsosnowski/

PONYBOY: How did you get into modeling?

MATTHEW SOSNOWSKI:   I started modeling for a few independent things in the spring of last year. It wasn’t until the summer when I was scouted by a photographer and introduced to Fusion. I signed with them in September, and so far I’m having a really great time.

PONYBOY:   What’s been your favorite shoot to work on so far?

MATTHEW SOSNOWSKI:   My favorite shoot has to be the one I did for Paper magazine. I loved the location for the shoot. It was at the Jane Hotel which had very Grand Budapest vibes and a very cool, rich layout.

PONYBOY:  What’s your dream campaign?

MATTHEW SOSNOWSKI:   My dream campaign would be for Saint Laurent. It’s such a classic line of clothing and I would be honored to have a chance to work with them.

PONYBOY:  What designers do you favor?

MATTHEW SOSNOWSKI:  This is always a hard question for me to answer because my opinion always changes. At the moment I really like Gypsy Sport, Acne Studios, Ulyana Sergenko, Meedham Kirchhoff and Raf Simmons.

PONYBOY:  What other interests do you have besides modeling?

MATTHEW SOSNOWSKI:    Outside of modeling, I’m a student in high school. I was just accepted to London College of Fashion for textile design and I’m still in the process of applying to a few more schools in New York. I really enjoy painting, fashion design and sculpture.

OMAR AHMED

PONYBOY:  What’s your age, place of origin and Instagram?

OMAR AHMED:   20, Cairo, Egypt. https://www.instagram.com/omarrahmed/

PONYBOY: How did you get into modeling?

OMAR AHMED:   A friend of mine asked to take a few pictures of me and submitted them to a few companies, leading to my first gig almost three years ago.

PONYBOY:   What’s been your favorite shoot to work on so far?

OMAR AHMED:  My favorite shoot to work on so far, that I can actually talk about, was a Miu Miu special I did with Dust Magazine. I enjoyed all the people at the shoot and the clothes were amazing!!

PONYBOY:  What’s your dream campaign?

OMAR AHMED:   My dream campaign would probably be a fragrance or sunglass campaign for some really high-end designer! It would be cool to see myself on ads all over the place. Haha!

PONYBOY:  What designers do you favor?

OMAR AHMED:  I personally adore Vetements and Gucci. I love how designers from both take classic looks and bold colors and rework them to perfection!

PONYBOY:  What other interests do you have besides modeling?

OMAR AHMED:    Alongside modeling, I am a humanitarian/student studying Public Health and Environmental Science, hoping I land a job working for the United Nations in the future. I want to help make a difference in much of the human inequality that exists all around the world today.

SETH WILKERSON

PONYBOY:  What’s your age, place of origin and Instagram?

SETH WILKERSON:   24, Wantage, NJ. https://www.instagram.com/sethmartin24/

PONYBOY: How did you get into modeling?

SETH WILKERSON:   I was discovered by a photographer while I was sitting on the trunk of my car at a gas station. He took some digitals a couple days later and sent them to people he knew at agencies. It came completely out of the blue.

PONYBOY:   What’s been your favorite shoot to work on so far?

SETH WILKERSON:  One shoot that comes to mind wasn’t even a job, it was a test shoot. I learned so much from the photographer, I should have brought a notebook or two.

PONYBOY:  What’s your dream campaign?

SETH WILKERSON:   It would be amazing to work for Tommy Hilfiger or Calvin Klein. I love the simple, classic look.

PONYBOY:  What designers do you favor?

SETH WILKERSON:  I love Calvin. They make clothes that work with the person wearing them, instead of clothes that try to do all the work.

PONYBOY:  What other interests do you have besides modeling?

SETH WILKERSON:    I’m a fan of the outdoors. I grew up in a rural area, so I enjoy getting out there and exploring. I also started doing martial arts when I was young. And I love to broaden my education by training.

HYANNIS PORT
STYLE

  • Dutty Wruck wears a vintage sweater from Beacon's Closet NY, trousers from Jack Spade, and tennis shoes from Keds. Photo by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy Magazine.
  • Male model Dutty Wruck wears a vintage sweater and trousers from Brooks Brothers for Ponyboy Magazine men's editorial
  • Model Dutty Wruck wears a vintage sweater from Stocked Vintage NY, trousers from J. Crew, and loafers from Bass. Photographed by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy Magazine in New York.
  • Adam Model NY Dutty Wruck, photographed by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy Magazine in New York.
  • Male model Dutty Wruck waers a vintage sweater from 10 Ft. Single NY, trousers from Jack Spade, loafers from Bally, and a vintage belt from Double RL & Co. NY. Photographed by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy Magazine NY.
  • Model Dutty Wruck photographed by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy Magazine men's editorial
  • Dutty Wruck from Adam Models NY, photographed by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy Magazine in New York.
  • Dutty Wruck wears a vintage sweater from Screaming Mimi's NY, trousers from Polo Ralp Lauren, and Bass Weejun loafers. Photographed by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy Magazine in New York.
  • Model Dutty Wruck wears a vintage sweater from 10 Ft. Single NY, trousers from Brooks Brothers and Gucci loafers. Photographed by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy Magazine.
  • Male model Dutty Wruck wears sunglasses by Ray-Ban. Photographed by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy Magazine.

DUTTY WRUCK

THE VINTAGE SWEATER

Our men’s vintage sweater editorial was inspired by the cool and casual style of John F. Kennedy. JFK spent his down time at the Kennedy compound in Hyannis Port sailing and playing touch football with family members. His style was always traditional and effortless. We booked male model Dutty Wruck from Adam Models NY to play our East Coast bred Kennedy. Dutty has the classic good looks to fit the bill. Our stylist Xina Giatas put Dutty in vintage sweaters, preppy loafers with no socks, and the necessary Ray Ban sunglasses. Men’s groomer Walton Nunez gave Dutty a traditional pompadour, and we let it fall in the wind for a just jumped off the sailboat look.

PETER SOM
S/S 2015

  • Peter Som Spring/Summer 2015 collection at Milk Studios in New York. Photographed for Ponyboy Magazine by Alexander Thompson.
  • Models wear graphic patterns on the Peter Som S/S15 runway. Photographs by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy Magazine.
  • Model Lina Berg walks for Peter Som S/S15 runway show in New York City. Photographed by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy Magazine.
  • Models walk in the Spring/Summer 2015 Peter Som show at Milk Studios in New York City. Photographed by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy Magazine.
  • Spring/Summer 2015 creations by New York designer Peter Som. Photographed by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy Magazine.
  • Models wear oversized sunglasses on the Peter Som S/S15 runway at Milk Studios in New York. Photos by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy Magazine.
  • Models in black and white clothing on the runway for Peter Som Spring/Summer 2015. Photographed at Milk Studios by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy Magazine.
  • Models on the runway in striped creations, designed by Peter Som S/S15. Photos by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy Magazine.
  • Peter Som Spring/Summer 2015, photographed by Alexander Thompson at Milk Studios for Ponyboy Magazine.
  • Models walk the runway for Peter Som S/S15 at Milk Studios in New York. Photos by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy Magazine.
  • Models on the runway in striped creations, designed by Peter Som S/S15. Photo by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy Magazine.
  • Striped clothing on models at the Peter Som S/S15 runway show at Milk Studios NY. Photographs by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy Magazine.
  • Models wear oversized sunglasses on the Peter Som S/S15 runway at Milk Studios in New York. Photos by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy Magazine.
  • Model Larissa Hoffman photographed on the runway for Peter Som S/S15. Photo by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy Magazine in New York.
  • Floral fashions by designer Peter Som, S/S15 collection New York. Photos by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy Magazine.
  • Model Soo Joo Park walks the runway for Peter Som S/S15. Photographed at Milk Studios New York by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy Magazine.
  • A strapless red gown on the runway at Milk Studios NY, designed by Peter Som, Spring/Summer 2015. Photographed by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy Magazine.
  • German model Larissa Hoffman, photographed backstage at Peter Som S/S15 in New York. Photo by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy Magazine.
  • A model snapped backstage at Peter Som S/S15, at Milk Studios NYC. Photographed by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy Magazine.
  • A freckled face model backstage at Peter Som S/S15 in New York. Photo by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy Magazine.
  • A model photographed backstage by Alexander Thompson at the Peter Som S/S15 show, for Ponyboy Magazine.
  • Fushion NY model Lina Berg, photographed backstage at Peter Som S/S15 in New York. Photograph by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy Magazine.

PETER SOM S/S 2015

ALL-AMERICAN POP ART

Peter Som, the modern American sportswear designer, showed his Pop Art inspired Spring/Summer 2015 collection at Milk Studios in New York City. Som has always stayed true to his chic and timeless looks. And this season was no different. Both the rose print and the graphic floral print he used were a decided nod to Andy Warhol’s flowers and printing techniques. Indeed, there were so many elements to this collection. The bold, oversized horizontal stripes proved quite striking and dramatic. We saw an abundance of white tailored men’s shirts, our favorite being a long dramatic shirt dress, as well as aprons, rubber macs, and gold lame.  An a-line top with flower appliques worn with a long, full black skirt was very reminiscent of vintage Paris couture. And, although the elements were varied, the outcome was a very refreshing, appealing and elegant collection. Photography ALEXANDER THOMPSON.

PATRIK ERVELL
S/S 2015

  • Male model Nicholas Costa walks for the Patrik Ervell Spring/Summer 2015 menswear collection at Milk Studios in New York City. Photographed by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy Magazine.
  • Male models on the runway in frosted raincoats by New York designer Patrik Ervell, Spring/Summer 2015. Photographed at Milk Studios in New York by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy Magazine.
  • Male models Dominik Sadoch and Dominik Hahn walk the runway for Patrik Ervell Spring/Summer 2015 collection at Milk Studios NY. Photographs by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy Magazine.
  • Spring/Summer 2015 New York menswear by Patrik Ervell, photographed at Milk Studios by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy Magazine.
  • Model Henry Kitcher walks for menswear designer Patrik Ervell, S/S15 at Milk Studios in New York. Photograph by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy Magazine.
  • Male models Karlis Adlers and Adam Butcher walk the runway for Patrik Ervell S/S15 collection at Milk Studios in New York. Photographs by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy Magazine.
  • Male model Luke Gernert walks the runway for Patrik Ervell S/S15 in New York City. Photographs by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy Magazine.
  • Male model Kyle Mobus walks the runway for Patrik Ervell Spring/Summer 2015. Photograph by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy Magazine.
  • UK male model David Metcalfe walks the runway for Patrik Ervell S/S15. Photographs by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy Magazine.
  • Models Corentin Renault and Laurie Harding walk for Patrik Ervell S/S15 collection at Milk Studios. Photographs by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy Magazine.
  • Male models walk in Spring/Summer 2015 clothing by menswear designer Patrik Ervell at Milk Studios NY. Photographs by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy Magazine.
  • Male models Geron McKinley and Roberto Sipos walk the runway for Patrik Ervell Spring/Summer 2015 at Milk Studios NY. Photographs by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy Magazine.
  • Male model James Magnum III walks in a vivid blue men's trench coat for Patrik Ervell S/S15 collection at Milk Studios. Photograph by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy Magazine.
  • B&W portrait of male model Dominik Sadoch, backstage at Patrik Ervell S/S15 by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy Magazine.
  • Portrait of a male model with new wave hair, backstage at Patrik Ervell Spring/Summer 2015 by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy Magazine.
  • Portrait of UK male model David Metcalfe, backstage at Patrik Ervell S/S15 by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy Magazine.
  • B&W portrait of a model, backstage at Patrik Ervell S/S15 by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy Magazine.
  • Portrait of model Henry Kitcher, backstage at Patrik Ervell S/S15 by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy Magazine.
  • Portrait of model Nicholas Costa, backstage at Patrik Ervell S/S15 by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy Magazine.
  • Portrait of a male model with 80's new wave inspired hair, backstage at Patrik Ervell S/S15 by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy Magazine.
  • A male model gets his hair sprayed, backstage at Patrik Ervell Spring/Summer 2015. Photograph by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy Magazine.
  • Male model James Magnum III leads the pack at Patrik Ervell S/S15 collection at Milk Studios in New York City. Photographed by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy Magazine.

PATRIK ERVELL S/S 2015

HI-TECH 

High tech 80’s interiors was the inspiration for Patrik Ervell’s Spring/Summer 2015 collection shown at New York City’s Milk Studios. Ervell’s models walked the runway and then posed in front of a moody back lit set with venetian blinds. The designer stated he watched a lot of 80’s Michael Mann films and the hi-tech interiors caught his eye. So, this season he used sturdy textiles that are usually meant for commercial interior design. We favored the macintosh trenches he created in bright red and blue with very exaggerated venting and pockets. The transparent rubber pieces are very futuristic and prove a bold statement on any modern man. Metallic track pants and shorts added a pop of color in polyurethane fabric. And, vibrant watercolor print silk pieces lent a great Spring touch to a very industrial collection. We were crazy for the big teased Ian McCulloch/Echo and The Bunnymen hair designed by the talented Holli Smith. Photography Alexander Thompson.

DUCKIE BROWN
S/S 2015

  • Duckie Brown Spring/Summer 2015 collection at Industria Studios in New York City. Photograph by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy Magazine.
  • Model Benjamin Jarvis wears a plaid ensemble by Duckie Brown for Sprin/Summer 2015. Photographs by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy Magazine.
  • Models Felix Gesnouin and Adonis Bosso, photographed in plaid menswear, backstage at Duckie Brown S/S15. Photographed by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy Magazine.
  • Male models, including David Metcalfe, backstage wearing the latest designs by Duckie Brown for Spring/Summer 2015. Photos by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy Magazine.
  • A male model wears a bucket hat for Spring/Summer 2015, designed by Duckie Brown. Photo by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy Magazine.
  • Male model Stefan Knezevic pose backstage for photographers at Duckie Brown S/S15. Photos taken by Alexander Thompson at Industria Studios in New York City, for Ponyboy Magazine.
  • Trousers & Jack Purcell footwear photographed by Alexander Thompson, backstage at Duckie Brown S/S15, for Ponyboy Magazine.
  • Models Botond Cseke and Roberto Sipos wearing the latest menswear designs from Duckie Brown, S/S15. Photos taken by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy Magazine in New York City.
  • Models, including Luke Gernert, photographed backstage in the latest menswear from New York label Duckie Brown. Photographs by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy Magazine.
  • A red-headed male model wears a hooded jacket designed by Duckie Brown S/S15. Photographed at Industria Studios in New York by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy Magazine.
  • Male models in plaid bucket hats and spring clothing, designed by New York label Duckie Brown S/S15. Photos by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy Magazine.
  • Male models, including Henry Kitcher, photographed in Duckie Brown S/S15 collection at Industria Studios in New York. Photo by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy Magazine.
  • A male model photographed backstage in a metallic blue jacket designed by Duckie Brown, S/S 2015. Photograph taken at Industria Studios in New York City by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy Magazine.
  • B&W portrait of a male model at Duckie Brown Spring/Summer 2015 in New York City. Photographed for Ponyboy Magazine by Alexander Thompson.
  • Portrait of male model Botond Cseke, backstage at Duckie Brown S/S15 in New York City. Photographed by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy Magazine.
  • A male model photographed backstage at Duckie Brown Spring/Summer 2015 collection at Industria Studios in NY. Photo by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy Magazine.
  • Male supermodel Roberto Sipos, photographed backstage at Duckie Brown S/S15. Portrait by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy Magazine.
  • British model Benjamin Jarvis, photographed backstage at Duckie Brown S/S15 in New York by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy Magazine.
  • Male models, including Roberto Sipos and Botond Cseke, in S/S15 designs for Duckie Brown. Photographed during New York Fashion Week at Industria Studios by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy Magazine.

DUCKIE BROWN S/S 2015

MAD FOR PLAID

The Duckie Brown menswear collection for Spring/Summer 2015 was all about pastels, plaids, stripes…and a bit of blue glitter thrown into the mix. Daniel Silver and Steven Cox, the duo behind the New York based label, had their Manchester roots immersed throughout this collection. The Verve and Stone Roses blasted at Industria Studios, as models walked the runway, draped in the Duckie Brown fusion of quirky meets conventional. We are crazy for anything plaid and the designers clashed plaids with pastels. Trousers were cut high waisted and we admired the 50’s style camp shirts. Models wore white Jack Purcell sneakers, the quintessential choice for a young gentleman. A standout piece that charmed us was the terrific oversized white hooded trench. And, we love that they threw in a blue glam glitter jacket! Our love affair with Duckie Brown menswear always keeps our wandering eye at bay! Photography Alexander Thompson.

PYER MOSS
S/S 2015

  • Max Vann Isser for Pyer Moss Sprin/Summer 2015 collection. Photographed in NYC by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy Magazine.
  • A male model photographed in Pyer Moss S/S15 collection. Photographed at New York City's Milk Studios by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy Magazine.
  • Male models photographed in the latest menswear at Pyer Moss S/S15 presentation at Milk Studios NY. Photos by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy Magazine.
  • The latest from Pyer Moss, Spring/Summer 2015. Photographed in New York at Milk Studios. Photograph by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy Magazine.
  • Male models in color blocked menswear, at Pyer Moss Spring/Summer 2015. Photographed by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy Magazine at Milk Studios.
  • Model Eli Hall wearing Pyer Moss Spring/Summer 2015 collection at Milk Studios in New York. Photographed by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy Magazine.
  • Models photographed in Pyer Moss Spring/Summer 2015 at Milk Studios in Manhattan. Images by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy Magazine.
  • Male model Max Van Isser, from the Fusion Agency NY, models for Pyer Moss S/S15. Photographed at Milk Studios NY by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy Magazine.
  • Male models photographed at Pyer Moss S/S15 presentation at Milk Studios NY. Photographed by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy Magazine.
  • A male model in the latest Pyer Moss S/S15 collection. Presented at Milk Studios in New York. Photograph by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy Magazine.
  • Shoes from the Pyer Moss collection, Spring/Summer 2015. Photo by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy Magazine.
  • Close up of a male model at Pryer Moss Spring/Summer 2015 presentation. Photographed by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy Magazine in New York City.
  • Profile shot of male models at Pyer Moss S/S15. Photograph by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy Magazine.

PYER MOSS S/S 2015

NINETIES SCI-FI

Menswear designer Kerby Jean-Raymond was clearly inspired by 90’s futuristic, sci-fi films when he designed his Pyer Moss Spring/Summer 2015 menswear collection, which was shown at Milk Studios in Manhattan. Movies such as Terminator ll and Total Recall were among his favorites. The luxury sportswear line included modern silhouettes, geometrics, black & white color-blocking with a touch of red, the use of high tech fabrics and lots and lots of layering for effect. This is contemporary men’s sportswear at it’s best. Photography Alexander Thompson.

JEREMY SCOTT
S/S 2015

  • The Spring/Summer 2015 collection presented by Jeremy Scott, at Milk Studios in New York. Photographed by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy Magazine.
  • Colorful designs by Jeremy Scott, Spring/Summer 2015. Photographed at Milk Studios by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy Magazine.
  • Psychedelic men's fashions at Jeremy Scott Spring 2015 collection in New York City. Photographed by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy Magazine.
  • 60's-70's
  • Hippie Love at Jeremy Scott Spring/Summer 2015 collection in New York City. Photograph by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy Magazine.
  • 60's inspired fashions at Jeremy Scott Spring/Summer 2015 collection in New York City. Photos by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy Magazine.
  • Colorful creations on the Jeremy Scott S/S15 runway. Photos by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy Magazine.
  • Colorful dresses on the runway at Jeremy Scott S/S15 show. Photographed at Milk Studios in New York City by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy Magazine.
  • Colorful women's creations by Jeremy Scott Spring/Summer 2015 collection. Photos by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy Magazine.
  • Men's fashions by Jeremy Scott Spring/Summer 2015, shown at Milk Studios in New York. Photographs by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy Magazine.
  • Young hippie inspired fashions on the runway at Jeremy Scott Spring/Summer 2015 collection. Photo by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy Magazine.
  • Colorful hippie clothing created by Jeremy Scott Spring/Summer 2015. Shown at Milk Studios in New York City. Photographed by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy Magazine.
  • Youthful fashions on the runway at Jeremy Scott Spring/Summer 2015 collection in New York. Photographed by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy Magazine.
  • Slogan t-shirts at Jeremy Scott Spring/Summer 2015 collection in New York. Photographs by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy Magazine.
  • Psychedelic fashions at Jeremy Scott S/S15 in New York City at Milk Studios. Photos for Ponyboy Magazine by Alexander Thompson.
  • Bold graphic t-shirts on the runway at Jeremy Scott Spring/Summer 2015 show at Milk Studios. Photographs by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy Magazine.
  • Men's and women's 70's inspired fashions at Jeremy Scott Spring/Summer 2015 collection at Milk Studios in New York. Photographs by Alexander Thompson.
  • Models in the latest Jeremy Scott creations for Spring/Summer 2015. Photographed in New York City at Milk Studios by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy Magazine.
  • Printed clothing at Jeremy Scott Spring/Summer 2015 runway show in New York City. Photographed at Milk Studios by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy Magazine.
  • Supermodel Soo Joo Park, on the catwalk at Jeremy Scott S/S15. Photographed by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy Magazine.
  • Supermodel Soo Joo Park, snapped backstage at Jeremy Scott S/S15 collection. Photographed by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy Magazine.
  • A young model snapped backstage at Jeremy Scott Spring/Summer 2015 collection at Milk Studios. Photo by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy Magazine.
  • A model snapped backstage at Jeremy Scott Spring/Summer 2015 collection at Milk Studios in NYC. Photograph for Ponyboy Magazine by Alexander Thompson.
  • A male model photographed backstage in New York at Jeremy Scott S/S15 by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy Magazine.
  • A beautiful blonde freckled model photographed backstage at Jeremy Scott Spring/Summer 2015 collection at Milk Studios in New York. Photograph by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy Magazine.
  • A braided blonde model photographed backstage at Jeremy Scott Spring/Summer 2015 at Milk Studios in New York. Photograph by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy Magazine.
  • Backstage at Jeremy Scott Spring/Summer 2015 collection. Photographed by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy Magazine at Milk Studios New York City.

JEREMY SCOTT S/S 2015

HIPPIE LOVE

Jeremy Scott’s Spring/Summer 2015 collection, shown at Milk Studios in New York City, paid homage to the “Summer of Love.” Scott sent models down the runway in tie-dyes and psychedelic creations, a mix of Woodstock and Malibu Barbie. The entire collection seemed inspired by a fun-filled day at a music festival. We loved the bubblegum pink fur with daisies, reminiscent of the 60’s Vogue cover of Twiggy. Very colorful floral baby doll dresses, crop tops paired with capri pants and patchwork galore screamed a groovy Marsha Brady. These fashions paired well with pop star Miley Cyrus’ kooky, fun art/accessories. The eclectic jewelry collection she designed for Scott, dubbed “Dirty Hippie,” was essentially a jumble of plastic toys and beads. See you at Coachella next year! Photography Alexander Thompson.

TIM COPPENS
S/S 2015

  • Tim Coppens S/S15 at Milk Studios in New York City. Photographs for Ponyboy Magazine by Alexander Thompson.
  • Male models wear the latest from Tim Coppens Spring/Summer 2015. Photographs by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy Magazine.
  • AS Management model Dominik Sadoch photographed backstage at Tim Coppens S/S15. Photos by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy Magazine.
  • Hanne Gaby Odiele photographed on the runway for Tim Coppens S/S15 at Milk Studios in New York City. Photographs by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy Magazine.
  • Models on the runway for Tim Coppens Spring/Summer 2015 at Milk Studios in New York. Photos for Ponyboy Magazine by Alexander Thompson.
  • Male models in sleek menswear by Belgian designer Tim Coppens S/S15. Photos by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy Magazine.
  • Hanne Gaby Odiele photographed on the runway for Tim Coppens S/S15 at Milk Studios NY. Photograph by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy Magazine.
  • The debut of Tim Coppens S/S 2015 womenswear line in New York City. Photos by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy Magazine.
  • Menswear by Tim Coppens S/S15 , at Milk Studios in New York. Photos for Ponyboy Magazine by Alexander Thompson.
  • The debut of Tim Coppens S/S 2015 womenswear in New York City. Photos by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy Magazine.
  • Models on the runway at Milk Studios for the debut of Tim Coppens S/S15 womenswear line. Photographed by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy Magazine.
  • A male model snapped backstage by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy Magazine at Tim Coppens S/S15.
  • AS Management male model Dominik Sadoch photographed backstage at Tim Coppens S/S15. Photo by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy Magazine.
  • A male model backstage in makeup at Tim Coppens Spring/Summer 2015. Photographed at Milk Studios in New York by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy Magazine.
  • A male model backstage in hair for Tim Coppens S/S15. Photograph by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy Magazine.
  • A young male model photographed backstage at the Tim Coppens S/S15 runway show at Milk Studios NY. Photo by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy Magazine.
  • Hanne Gaby Odiele photographed backstage during hair/makeup at Tim Coppens S/S15 at Milk Studios in New York. Photograph by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy Magazine.
  • A model poses backstage at the Tim Coppens S/S15 runway show. Photographed for Ponyboy Magazine by Alexander Thompson.

TIM COPPENS S/S 2015

HIGH TECH

Belgian designer Tim Coppens Spring/Summer 2015 runway collection was all about sleek, high-tech sportswear with clean lines and zipper detailing. The designer sent his mannequins down the catwalk with wet-looking, matted down hair paired with shiny glowing skin, as if  having been out all night at the clubs. Signature elements were color blocking, splashes of a “jungle” print, and the obligatory black mesh thrown in. We absolutely loved the men’s super modern bombers in white. The designer’s sixth season, this collection also brought the introduction of his highly anticipated womenswear line. Far from being unisex, the women’s line takes on a more fitted, tailored construction than the men’s. As always, Tim Coppens succeeds in presenting a very modern and youthful, forward vision of dressing for men. And this now includes women. Photography Alexander Thompson.

ROCHAMBEAU
S/S 2015

  • The Rochambeau Spring/Summer 2015 presentation at Milk Studios in New York City. Photo by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy Magazine.
  • Model Adam Kasewski photographed at Rochambeau S/S15. Photograph by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy Magazine.
  • Male models at Milk Studio NYC, in the lasts Spring/Summer 2015 creations by Rochambeau. Photographs by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy Magazine.
  • Male models in Rochambeau S/S15, at Milk Made in New York City. Photographs for Ponyboy Magazine by Alexander Thompson.
  • A male model in an afro and sunglasses at Rochambeau S/S 2015 presentation at Milk Made. Photograph by Alexander Thompson.
  • Models at Milk Studios for the Rochambeau Spring/Summer 2015 presentation. Imagess by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy Magazine.
  • A male model photographed at Rochambeau S/S15 presentation during New York Fashion Week. Photo by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy Magazine.
  • Male models in sleeveless shirts at Rochambeau S/S15 presentation at Milk Studios. Photographs by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy Magazine.
  • Models at Milk Made during New York Fashion week, wearing Rochambeau S/S15. Photographs by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy Magazine.
  • A male model in a visor at the Rochambeau S/S15 presentation at Milk Studios in New York. Photo for Ponyboy Magazine by Alexander Thompson.
  • Male models photographed onstage at Rochambeau Spring/Summer 2015 presentation. Photos by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy Magazine.
  • Models of the moment, Benjamin Jarvis and Adam Kaszewski photographed at Rochambeau S/S15 presentation in New York City. Photos by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy Magazine.
  • A male models tattooed legs in espadrilles, at the Rochambeau S/S15 presentation at Milk Studios NY. Photo by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy Magazine.
  • The Rochambeau Spring/Summer 2015 presentation, in New York City at Milk Studios. Photograph by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy Magazine.

ROCHAMBEAU S/S 2015

WASHED AT SEA

Laurence Chandler and Joshua Cooper, the designers behind the menswear line Rochambeau, had their models hit the sea for Spring/Summer 2015. The duo’s presentation at New York City’s Milk Studios resembled a dock on the ocean, which fit well with the overall theme of their collection. Featured on UK supermodel Benjamin Jarvis, the fisherman sweater with matching shorts was a fresh take on a classic.  There were some intriguing hoodies, a super fashionable purple rain slicker, a photo print of ocean waves and some little touches that lent to the nautical effect, like the fishing net vest on model Adam Kaszewski and some classic beach accessories like visors, wooden beaded necklaces, espadrilles and even submarine goggles. In fact, this show made us dream for summer again, just as the fall has begun. Photography Alexander Thompson.

MARTIN KEEHN
S/S 2015

  • Male models on the runway at Martin Keehn S/S15 collection. Photographed by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy Magazine.
  • Male models in safari style clothing for Martin Keehn Spring/Summer 2015. Photographed by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy Magazine.
  • Male models in pajama style clothing at Martin Keehn S/S 2015 fashion show. Photographed for Ponyboy Magazine by Alexander Thompson.
  • Male models walk the runway during New York Fashion Week for Martin Keehn S/S15. Photographs by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy Magazine.
  • Male models in leather mesh shirts designed by Martin Keehn S/S 2015. Photographed by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy Magazine.
  • Male models in pullovers designed by Martin Keehn S/S15. Photo by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy Magazine.
  • Models in athletic inspired clothing designed by Martin Keehn Spring/Summer 2015. Photographed by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy Magazine.
  • Male models in white athletic inspired clothing, designed by Martin Keehn S/S15. Photo by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy Magazine.
  • Male models in athletic jackets by Martin Keehn S/S 2015. Photos by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy Magazine.
  • Male models in athletic inspired clothing designed by Martin Keehn Spring/Summer 2015 presented in New York City. Photographed by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy Magazine.
  • Male models on the runway for Martin Keehn S/S15. Photographs by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy Magazine.
  • Male models in dress jackets designed by Martin Keehn S/S15. Photographed for Ponyboy Magazine in New York City, by Alexander Thompson.
  • Models walk the runway for Martin Keehn S/S15 collection, presented in New York City during fashion week. Photos by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy Magazine.
  • A male model walks for New York City designer Martin Keehn S/S 2015 during fashion week. Photographed by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy Magazine.

MARTIN KEEHN S/S 2015

NYC MAN ON THE GO

The Martin Keehn Spring/Summer menswear collection 2015 was shown on the Lower East Side of New York City. When first entering the space, we noticed many of the male models were muscular, which is a much different look than the boyish, svelte men that we usually see walking during fashion week. Some of the models sported outrageous blow-dried 80’s style pompadours, created by hair guru Jimmy Paul. There was also the heavily sprayed-on tans by make-up artist Marc Carrasquillo, using Evolution Man products. The aura of the space was definitely downtown 80’s New York. This was enhanced by a trash can filled with tall boy beers, as well as a big harsh hot light used to illuminate models on the runway. There were some kinks with the sound system, but models still walked and it really lent to that D.I.Y. house party feel. There was no stopping the Martin Keehn man! Brilliant pieces ranged from safari/military khakis to a 50’s style “pajama” set. Most of the looks had an athletic inspired touch for the New York City man on-the-go. The designer used mesh leather fabric for shirts and tank tops, as well as a “Gucci” horse bit buckle on a few shirts. Lastly, we won’t forget to mention the beer holder attached to men’s belts, which is every man’s dream! Photography Alexander Thompson.

THE BLONDS
S/S 2015

  • The Blonds Spring/Summer 2015 collection, presented at New York's Milk Studios. Photograph by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy Magazine.
  • The talented Phillipe Blond, co-designer for The Blonds, walks for the Spring/Summer 2015 collection at Milk Studios in New York. Photograph by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy Magazine.
  • Models on the runway in the latest designs from design duo The Blonds. Photographed at Milk Studios NY by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy Magazine.
  • The Blonds NY S/S15 collection, presented at Milk Studios New York during fashion week. Photographs by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy Magazine.
  • Over-the-top creations by The Blonds Spring/Summer 2015 collection. Photographed at New York's Milk Studios by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy Magazine.
  • A bejeweled bodysuit and thigh high boots, created by The Blonds S/S15. Photographed at Milk Studios by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy Magazine.
  • Custom creations by New York City design duo The Blonds, for Spring/Summer 2015. Photographed at Milk Studios by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy Magazine.
  • Chola inspired designs by The Blonds NY. Photographed by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy Magazine.
  • A model walks for The Blonds S/S15 in New York CIty at Milk Studios, photographed by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy Magazine.
  • Creations on the runway by The Blonds S/S15 collection, photographed in New York City by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy Magazine.
  • A tattoed bodysuit created by The Blonds NY, shown during New York Fashion Week at Milk Studios. Photos by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy Magazine.
  • A bodysuit made to look like a candle with wax drippings, on the runway for The Blonds S/S15. Photo by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy Magazine.
  • A portrait of a model with a huge braid, photographed backstage at The Blonds S/S15. Photograph taken by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy Magazine.
  • Models photographed right after The Blonds S/S15 show at Milk Studios in New York City. Photos by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy Magazine.
  • A profile of a model in an elaborate hairdo, backstage at The Blonds Spring/Summer 2015 collection. Photograph by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy Magazine.
  • Models photographed after the show, backstage at the Blonds S/S15 show in New York. Photos by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy Magazine.
  • A model photographed backstage at The Blonds S/S15 show, in an oversized blonde wig. Photograph by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy Magazine.
  • A model backstage posing for a photographer, at The Blonds S/S15 collection at Milk Studios NY. Photograph by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy Magazine.
  • Models snapped backstage at The Blonds S/S15 collection at Milk Studios in New York. Photographed by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy Magazine.
  • A model in an oversized braid, backstage at The Blonds S/S15 collection at Milk Studios NY. Photographed by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy Magazine.
  • Models gets ready to change backstage at The Blonds S/S15 show at Milk Studios in New York. Photographed by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy Magazine.
  • Portrait of two beautiful models, backstage at The Blonds S/S15 in New York City. Photograph by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy Magazine.
  • Young models pose for photographer Alexander Thompson, backstage at The Blonds S/S15 show. Ponyboy Magazine.
  • Backstage at The Blonds, S/S15. Photograph by Alexander Thompson at Milk Studios NY, for Ponyboy Magazine.
  • Close up photo of a model's hair, backstage at The Blonds Spring/Summer 2015. Photo by Alexander Thompson for Ponyboy Magazine.

THE BLONDS S/S 2015

“CHOLA LOVE”

Classic is not a term that is usually associated with The Blonds. However, this over-the-top collection presented at Milk Studios in New York was “Classic Blonds” in every way. Phillipe and David Blond, the extremely creative design duo behind the collection, channeled a harem of Chola girls for Spring/Summer 2015. It was pure bad girl beauty including their signature over-the-top jewel encrusted bodices and jumpsuits, as well as sheer harem pants, tattoo bodysuits, and silk roses galore! Our best loved piece would have to be the mind blowing, religiously inspired “candle-dripped” corset. Can you say Catholic Couture? The styling was on the mark as well, including insane nails, gigantic blonde Rapunzel style braids and enormous gold door-knocker banji earrings. The teardrop tattoo on upper cheek was a genius and crucial touch created by make-up wizard Kabuki. The Blonds held true to their twisted, glamorous style as the couturiers of the pop star set. So, lookout for their spectacular creations on upcoming tours all over the world! And on a final note, besides all of the fabulous night club personalities attending the show, we truly enjoyed an impromptu whirl and twirl on the runway by The Lady Bunny herself, in her classic psychedelic micro mini and gargantuan wig. Photography Alexander Thompson.